“High” or “Medium” Priority AIDS Research on Non-AIDS-defining or AIDS-defining Cancers (R21)

PA-16-425
“High” or “Medium” Priority AIDS Research on Non-AIDS-defining or AIDS-defining Cancers (R21)
Department of Health and Human

Print Services
National Institutes of Health

Section I. Funding Opportunity Description
Purpose

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to continue advancing our understanding of the risks, development, progression, diagnosis, and treatment of malignancies observed in individuals with an underlying human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), particularly the non-AIDS defining malignancies which are now a leading cause of death in HIV-infected individuals.

This FOA encourages high or medium priority AIDS research in areas such as the study of the etiologic factors, cofactors, immunopathogenesis, diagnosis, and consequences of both non-AIDS defining and AIDS-defining malignancies in populations with an underlying HIV infection.

This FOA encourages research efforts that will (i) identify specific contributions resulting from HIV infection and its potential interaction with other pathogens for the development and pathogenesis of these cancers and (ii) provide information on the clinical outcomes of such cancers in the HIV-infected population.

Ultimately, such efforts could inform screening approaches and therapies targeted to the HIV-infected population.

This FOA utilizes the Exploratory/Developmental Grant (R21) mechanism, which supports investigation of novel scientific ideas or new model systems, tools, or technologies that have the potential for significant impact on biomedical or biobehavioral research. An R21 grant application need not have extensive background material or preliminary information.

This FOA runs in parallel with another FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-16-426, which utilizes the Exploratory/Developmental Grant (R01) mechanism.

Scope

In 2015, NIH and OAR mandated that in the future, AIDS funds can only be used in for research addressing “high” or “medium” priority areas of AIDS research as defined in NOT-OD-15-137“NIH HIV/AIDS Research Priorities and Guidelines for Determining AIDS Funding”.

Topics considered “low priority” AIDS in NOT-OD-15-137 are not appropriate for this PAR except basic research in tumors caused by KSHV has, for the moment, been considered as “high priority” AIDS and will be eligible for funding under this PAR.  All applications considered for funding will be reviewed by OAR and must be aligned with the priorities in NOT-OD-15-137.

Specific areas of study in the indicated categories may include, but are not limited to, the following examples:

A) Biomarkers, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics:

  • Discovery of reliable molecular and immunological diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and pathogen markers, useful for early detection, progression, or response to treatment of non-AIDS-defining and AIDS-defining malignancies;
  • Discovery and development of novel targets and efficacious new therapeutic agents, interventional strategies, or improved delivery systems for the treatment of cancer in people with HIV infection, however clinical trials are not permitted;
  • Studies to understand the pharmacokinetics of targeted therapies for AIDS-defining and non-AIDS defining malignancies in the context of highly active antiretroviral therapy and;
  • Studies utilizing existing cohorts and tissue banks of human specimens from a wide spectrum of AIDS-defining and non-AIDS defining malignancies to develop biomarker, diagnostic assays, or analyze samples and data acquired from these cohorts is encouraged. Examples of such cohorts and repositories include:
  • AIDS and Cancer Specimen Resource (ACSR),
  • Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS)),
  • Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS)
  • Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS).

Investigators are also encouraged to utilize infrastructure support of the Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) or NCI designated Cancer Centers if located at those institutions.

However, descriptive research and recruitment or retention of cohorts are not appropriate for this FOA.

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: PA-16-425
Funding Opportunity Title: “High” or “Medium” Priority AIDS Research on Non-AIDS-defining or AIDS-defining Cancers (R21)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Opportunity Category Explanation:  
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Education
Health
Category Explanation:  
Expected Number of Awards:  
CFDA Number(s): 93.121 — Oral Diseases and Disorders Research
93.393 — Cancer Cause and Prevention Research
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Version: Synopsis 1
Posted Date: Sep 07, 2016
Last Updated Date: Sep 07, 2016
Original Closing Date for Applications: Sep 07, 2019  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Sep 07, 2019  
Archive Date: Oct 08, 2019
Estimated Total Program Funding:  
Award Ceiling: $200,000
Award Floor:

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants: Special district governments
Small businesses
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
County governments
Independent school districts
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher education
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
State governments
City or township governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Additional Information on Eligibility: Other Eligible Applicants include the following: Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions; Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISISs); Eligible Agencies of the Federal Government; Faith-based or Community-based Organizations; Hispanic-serving Institutions; Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Other than Federally Recognized); Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Organizations); Regional Organizations; Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) ; U.S. Territory or Possession.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to continue advancing our understanding of the risks, development, progression, diagnosis, and treatment of malignancies observed in individuals with an underlying human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), particularly the non-AIDS defining malignancies which are now a leading cause of death in HIV-infected individuals. This FOA encourages high or medium priority AIDS research in areas such as the study of the etiologic factors, cofactors, immunopathogenesis, diagnosis, and consequences of both non-AIDS defining and AIDS-defining malignancies in populations with an underlying HIV infection.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-16-425.html
Grantor Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

NIH OER Webmaster FBOWebmaster@OD.NIH.GOV

If you have any problems linking to this funding announcement, please contact the NIH OER Webmaster

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Bold New Bioengineering Methods and Approaches for Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep Disorders and Diseases (R21)

RFA-HL-17-015
Bold New Bioengineering Methods and Approaches for Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep Disorders and Diseases (R21)
Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Healthnew lungs

Purpose

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to seek innovative, high-risk bioengineering research for which preliminary results have not yet been obtained, explore new approaches or concepts that are important to a substantive heart, lung, blood or sleep disorder or disease, support the translation of research into practice, technologies, or commercial products, and to develop trans-disciplinary projects upon which significant future research may be built.  This  program will allow investigators to enter new fields and apply cutting-edge approaches to improve the Nation’s health through bioengineering research.  In particular, ground-breaking studies aimed towards the development of novel agents, materials or coatings related to medical devices and engineered tissues would be uniquely fostered by this FOA.

Background

Originally conceptualized by the NIH Bioengineering Consortium in 2003, NHLBI Exploratory Bioengineering Research Grants (EBRGs) were submitted under PA-12-284 (reissued as PA-16-040, which is administered by NIBIB).  NHLBI examined its EBRG R21 portfolio and found this funding mechanism as a useful and cost-effective way for established investigators to open new areas of research. Our data suggests that low-cost, short term projects may incentivize research teams, especially those not captured by the traditional R01 mechanism.

Why Bioengineering? The NHLBI bioengineering community has transformed medicine by creating the artificial heart, pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators, Ventricular Assist Devices, stents, human tissue chip devices and cell/gene/combination product therapies. These examples demonstrate that bioengineering is a synergistic approach that crosses not only all technology-related areas of NHLBI, but also all of our Disease-specific domains. Further, bioengineering is unique because unlike most scientific focuses, such as heart disease, it demands collaboration across disciplines, which looks to be necessary for advancement of needed technologies. Our ability to achieve alternative and more effective therapies is an urgent need for NHLBI. It is envisioned that this targeted RFA will serve as an opportunity to address scientific gaps and to programmatically balance bioengineering projects across the NHLBI. We are seeking only the most unique, highly innovative and groundbreaking approaches with potential for significant impact on reducing the burden of disease. Applicants are advised to query NIH RePORTER to make sure their approach or idea has not been funded before.

The use of the R21 mechanism is intended to support short-term exploratory research projects. Long-term projects, or projects designed to increase knowledge in a well-established area, will not be considered for R21 awards. Additionally, R21 applications may involve considerable risk, so they should clearly explain the significance of the proposed work and why the potential impact outweighs these risks

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-HL-17-015
Funding Opportunity Title: Bold New Bioengineering Methods and Approaches for Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep Disorders and Diseases (R21)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Opportunity Category Explanation:
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.233 — National Center on Sleep Disorders Research
93.837 — Cardiovascular Diseases Research
93.838 — Lung Diseases Research
93.839 — Blood Diseases and Resources Research
93.840 — Translation and Implementation Science Research for Heart, Lung, Blood Diseases, and Sleep Disorders
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Jun 13, 2016
Last Updated Date: Jun 13, 2016
Original Closing Date for Applications: May 10, 2019  
Current Closing Date for Applications: May 10, 2019  
Archive Date: Jun 10, 2019
Estimated Total Program Funding: $1,350,000
Award Ceiling: $150,000

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Special district governments
County governments
City or township governments
State governments
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
Small businesses
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Independent school districts
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Private institutions of higher education
Additional Information on Eligibility: Other Eligible Applicants include the following: Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions; Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISISs); Eligible Agencies of the Federal Government; Faith-based or Community-based Organizations; Hispanic-serving Institutions; Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Other than Federally Recognized); Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Organizations); Regional Organizations; Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) ; U.S. Territory or Possession; Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Institutions) are not eligible to apply. Non-domestic (non-U.S.) components of U.S. Organizations are not eligible to apply. Foreign components, as defined in the NIH Grants Policy Statement, are allowed.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage basic, translational, and clinical proof-of-concept research projects that are needed for the advancement of bioengineering approaches for heart, lung, blood and sleep diseases.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HL-17-015.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

NIH OER Webmaster FBOWebmaster@OD.NIH.GOV
If you have any problems linking to this funding announcement, please contact the NIH OER Webmaster

Intervening with Cancer Caregivers to Improve Patient Health Outcomes and Optimize Health Care Utilization (R21)

PAR-16-318
Intervening with Cancer Caregivers to Improve Patient Health Outcomes and Optimize Health Care Utilization (R21)
Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health

breast-cancer-caregivers
Breast cancer care
Purpose

This purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to promote research on interventions designed to support caregivers of adult cancer patients. Interventions that are appropriate for this FOA may be intended to provide caregivers with care training, promote coping skills, and ultimately help them manage care. Outcomes of such interventions are expected to (1) optimize patient health care utilization, (2) improve caregiver well-being, and (3) improve patient physical health and psychosocial outcomes.

Applications submitted to this FOA should be exploratory and novel. These studies should break new ground or extend previous discoveries toward new directions or applications. Whereas this FOA is for pilot/exploratory projects, a companion FOA of identical scientific scope (PAR-16-317) is meant for well-developed projects supported by preliminary data.

Background

Informal/family cancer caregivers are individuals who manage care for cancer patients, usually a friend or family member. The care that they manage is typically uncompensated, delivered at home, involves significant amounts of time and energy, and requires the performance of tasks that may be physically, emotionally, socially, or financially demanding. Caregiving tasks can include monitoring for treatment side effects, helping manage symptom burden, treatment decision-making, administering medication, and performing some technical medical tasks (e.g., managing infusion ports, changing dressings). Cancer treatment is now more frequently provided in outpatient and community-based centers, which increases the day-to-day demands on informal caregivers. As lay supporters, caregivers are often underprepared to perform the many tasks required of them and this can lead to negative health consequences. Given that the prevalence of people, in particular older adults, living with cancer is growing, the number of cancer caregivers can also be expected to grow. This anticipated growth will be accompanied by simultaneous increases in the demands placed on caregivers, compounded by the fact that cancer care continues to move further into the outpatient and home settings. The physical and psychosocial health (e.g., comorbidities, depression) of patients and their caregivers are often related, suggesting a need to intervene to improve outcomes for both caregivers and patients.

Specific Research Objectives

Applications submitted to this FOA should propose intervention studies that target a combination of the cancer caregiving outcomes in the following three areas:

1. Healthcare utilization outcomes (e.g., patient readmission to the hospital, number of emergency room visits, caregiver use of health care services, and caregiver use of cancer support services);

2. Caregiver well-being outcomes (lower burden, higher capacity, and better quality of life), and

3. Patient health outcomes (e.g., physical health, symptom burden, health-related quality of life and functioning).

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-16-318
Funding Opportunity Title: Intervening with Cancer Caregivers to Improve Patient Health Outcomes and Optimize Health Care Utilization (R21)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Opportunity Category Explanation:
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Education
Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.395 — Cancer Treatment Research
93.399 — Cancer Control
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Jun 08, 2016
Last Updated Date: Jun 08, 2016
Original Closing Date for Applications: Apr 11, 2019  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Apr 11, 2019  
Archive Date: May 12, 2019
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $200,000

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Independent school districts
Private institutions of higher education
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
City or township governments
Small businesses
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
State governments
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
County governments
Special district governments
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Additional Information on Eligibility: Other Eligible Applicants include the following: Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions; Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISISs); Eligible Agencies of the Federal Government; Faith-based or Community-based Organizations; Hispanic-serving Institutions; Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Other than Federally Recognized); Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Organizations); Regional Organizations; Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) ; U.S. Territory or Possession; Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Institutions) are not eligible to apply. Non-domestic (non-U.S.) components of U.S. Organizations are not eligible to apply. Foreign components, as defined in the NIH Grants Policy Statement, are not allowed.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites applications for intervention research designed to support caregivers of adult cancer patients. Interventions supported by this FOA are intended to provide caregivers with care training, promote coping skills, and ultimately help them manage care. Outcomes of such interventions are expected to (1) optimize patient health care utilization, (2) improve caregiver well-being, and (3) improve patient physical health and psychosocial outcomes.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-16-318.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

NIH OER Webmaster FBOWebmaster@OD.NIH.GOV
If you have any problems linking to this funding announcement, please contact the NIH OER Webmaster

Mechanisms of Cancer and Treatment-related Symptoms and Toxicities (R21)

PA-16-258
Mechanisms of Cancer and Treatment-related Symptoms and Toxicities (R21)
Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Healthbladder-cancer-s1-illustration-of-bladder-cancer

Purpose

This FOA is intended to stimulate research aimed at better understanding the complex interaction of biological, cognitive, behavioral, and sociocultural factors that contribute to cancer and treatment related symptoms and toxicities throughout the disease trajectory. Data from these preliminary studies would be used to validate and extend the findings in larger cohort studies and/or test novel, mechanistically-driven interventions via the R01 funding mechanism. Of particular interest is to gain new insights about these factors, either alone or in combination, in minority, underserved, the elderly, and pediatric and young adult populations. Specifically, the FOA aims to identify, describe, and quantify these factors associated with acute and chronic symptoms and toxicities.

This FOA will utilize the exploratory/developmental research grant (R21) mechanism to foster cancer etiology and epidemiology research. While these studies may involve considerable risk, they may also lead to a breakthrough in a particular area, and to the development of novel techniques, agents, methodologies, models, or applications that could have a major impact on a field of cancer research (epidemiologic, biomedical, behavioral, or clinical).

Specific Research Objectives

Applications submitted to this FOA should examine the complex interaction of biological, cognitive, behavioral, and sociocultural factors that contribute to cancer and treatment related symptoms and toxicities throughout the disease trajectory. Applications should bring together transdisciplinary teams of investigators with expertise in symptom science, including behavior, biology, and other basic and clinical science disciplines relevant to the pathways being studied. The research may occur in a variety settings (academic, community), during the various stages of the disease trajectory (diagnosis, active treatment, post-treatment/survivorship, palliative care, hospice).

Research areas may include, but not limited to:

Biologic mechanisms of symptoms and toxicities

1. What biomarkers are ready to be validated in the clinical setting to elucidate the mechanisms of symptoms and treatment related toxicities?

2. What are the biomarkers that determine individual susceptibilities to symptoms and toxicities, either alone or in combination?

3. How do certain co-morbidities affect the development and severity of symptoms and toxicities?

4. What is the natural trajectory of selected symptoms lacking information?

5 Are there biological differences by race that would impart a different symptom experience?

Behavioral, psychological, and sociocultural factors contributing to the development of symptoms and toxicities

1. How do factors such as gender, age, and race/ethnicity influence the development and severity of symptoms and toxicities?

2. What are the clinical, genetic and behavioral profiles of patients, including racially and ethnically diverse populations, undergoing the same cancer treatment, who do and do not develop disease and treatment related symptoms and toxicities.

3. Are there predictive models of who may or may not develop certain symptoms and toxicities? Can severity and duration (acute to chronic) be predicted?

4. What are the influences of knowledge, attitudes and culture on the experience of symptoms and toxicities?

5. What factors, including self-management strategies, influence reporting of symptoms and toxicities?

Patient reported outcomes (PROs) in symptom research

1. What novel methods for the analysis of PROs, symptom and toxicity data can be developed beyond descriptive?

2. How can PRO data be used to customize interventions to prevent or manage symptoms and toxicities?

3. What PRO tools need validation in special populations or cultures?

The following types of projects are not appropriate for this FOA:

Clinical trials, either randomized or single arm, aimed at preventing or treating cancer or treatment related symptoms and toxicities.

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: PA-16-258
Funding Opportunity Title: Mechanisms of Cancer and Treatment-related Symptoms and Toxicities (R21)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Opportunity Category Explanation:
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Education
Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.393 — Cancer Cause and Prevention Research
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: May 16, 2016
Last Updated Date: May 16, 2016
Original Closing Date for Applications: Sep 07, 2019  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Sep 07, 2019  
Archive Date: Oct 08, 2019
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $200,000

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Independent school districts
State governments
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
For profit organizations other than small businesses
City or township governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Small businesses
Special district governments
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Private institutions of higher education
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
County governments
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Additional Information on Eligibility: Other Eligible Applicants include the following: Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions; Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISISs); Eligible Agencies of the Federal Government; Faith-based or Community-based Organizations; Hispanic-serving Institutions; Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Other than Federally Recognized); Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Organizations); Regional Organizations; Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) ; U.S. Territory or Possession.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites innovative pilot projects or feasibility studies to stimulate research aimed to better understand the complex interaction of biological, cognitive, behavioral, and sociocultural factors that contribute to cancer and treatment related symptoms and toxicities throughout the cancer care trajectory. Data from the preliminary studies would be used to validate and extend the findings in larger cohort studies and/or test novel, mechanistically-driven interventions via the R01 funding mechanism. Of particular interest is to gain new insights about these factors, either alone or in combination, in minority, underserved, the elderly, and pediatric and young adult populations. Specifically, the FOA aims to identify, describe, and quantify these factors associated with acute and chronic cancer and treatment related symptoms and toxicities.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-16-258.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

NIH OER Webmaster FBOWebmaster@OD.NIH.GOV
If you have any problems linking to this funding announcement, please contact the NIH OER Webmaster

Cancer-related Behavioral Research through Integrating Existing Data (R21)

PAR-16-255
Cancer-related Behavioral Research through Integrating Existing Data (R21)
Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health

Specific Research Objectives

NCI investment in IDA-related research would yield efficient and productive research that reduces costs, bridges behavioral research with other disciplines, and provides the ability to test hypotheses in ways that cannot be accomplished without data integration.

A. Enhanced Longitudinal Analyses

Prospective, longitudinal studies offer many advantages when studying processes or outcomes that develop or change over time; yet these types of studies are expensive and time-consuming.  Retrospective use of any one data set is often limited in scope. However, merging several similar data sets using IDA provides an opportunity to study a broader swath of behaviors and experiences to better understand developmental processes without having to collect new data. The basic idea is to merge multiple existing datasets that have common data elements but different cohorts. These methods incorporate an enhanced longitudinal component by extending the timeframe of the study without the added time needed to collect the data.  These more efficient types of IDA studies, however, require collaboration among researchers to share data, and the data must meet certain conditions before merging is possible. These conditions include having common data elements that assess process or outcome measures across studies and respondents with at least one common age (or any common variable that assesses a time-varying component) that serves to ‘link’ studies together. For instance, previous studies using these methods have examined changes in intellectual abilities over the lifespan and development of substance use and abuse in children, adolescents, and young adults. Application in the cancer arena would be particularly useful given that cancer-related behaviors, such as smoking and obesity, are initiated and maintained over a lifetime.

B. Assessment of Small Populations

Small populations are defined as populations for which the size, dispersion, or accessibility of the population of interest makes it difficult to obtain adequate sample sizes in order to test specific research questions. Examples of small populations include racial/ethnic sub-groups (e.g., Honduran Latin Americans), those with relatively rare characteristics (e.g., transgender persons), rare cancers, low base-rate behaviors, low income and rural populations, or people living in small geographic units such as census blocks or particular zip codes. The concern is that these groups may not be studied or may be aggregated inappropriately (e.g., combining all Latin American subgroups together) when there are important or unique characteristics of these groups that result in cancer-related health disparities or differences in specific cancer-related outcomes such as incidence or mortality. These types of studies have clear utility for understanding health disparities.

Benefits can be derived from linking methods to assess small geographic units. For example, methods such as small-area estimation would also be encouraged as a model-based approach to link information from population-based surveys. It takes advantage of the strengths of different surveys, with the goal of creating more accurate and precise outcomes at smaller geographic units.

C. Multi-level Analyses

Multi-level analyses can be achieved through data linkages. This refers to data collected at many levels of abstraction, that is, biological, behavioral, and societal. An example of this type of analysis would be a study that examines the relationship between individual smoking behavior measured through cotinine levels (as a biomarker) and self-reported smoking behavior; environmental factors such as number of stores selling cigarettes; and, finally, policy-level data such as cigarette taxes and indoor smoke-free laws.  These data could be linked by a geographic unit– such as county where the individual resides –and then analyzed as a whole. This approach would incorporate the effects of multiple levels of influence to understand their effects on behavior or test for the effects of interventions on changing behavior.

Research questions of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • What are the long-term effects of chemotherapy on fatigue, cognition, and other treatment-related outcomes, taking into account individual characteristics (e.g., coping, multiple morbidities), type of cancer, type of therapy, health care access and use practices; and what are the characteristics of the different clinics in which chemotherapy is performed, and how do these contribute?
  • How do individual risk perceptions, knowledge, and attitudes towards tobacco use interact with biological factors (e.g., ability to metabolize cotinine), environmental factors (i.e., built environment), and policy factors (e.g., laws banning smoking in restaurants and bars, cigarette taxes) to explain why current smokers continue to smoke or have trouble quitting?
  • How do personal attitudes towards vaccination and sexual behavior (as measured within parents, adolescents, and young adults) together with physician recommendations and accessibility to health care (as measured within the built environment) interact to influence HPV vaccination uptake?
  • What are the long-term trends in cancer incidence/mortality inequities? Have they changed over time, and what are biological, self-report, environmental, and policy factors that explain these differences? What can be learned to inform behavioral interventions based on these data?
  • What are the most valid and precise estimates of cancer-related predictors, mediators/moderators, and outcomes for small populations that can be obtained by merging across population-level surveys? For example, do Mexican Americans exercise more or less than Cuban Americans, and are there different between-group predictors?

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-16-255
Funding Opportunity Title: Cancer-related Behavioral Research through Integrating Existing Data (R21)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Opportunity Category Explanation:
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Education
Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.393 — Cancer Cause and Prevention Research
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: May 11, 2016
Last Updated Date: May 11, 2016
Original Closing Date for Applications: Jun 14, 2019  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Jun 14, 2019  
Archive Date: Jul 15, 2019
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $200,000

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Small businesses
City or township governments
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Independent school districts
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
County governments
Private institutions of higher education
Special district governments
State governments
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Additional Information on Eligibility: Other Eligible Applicants include the following: Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions; Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISISs); Eligible Agencies of the Federal Government; Faith-based or Community-based Organizations; Hispanic-serving Institutions; Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Other than Federally Recognized); Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Organizations); Regional Organizations; Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) ; U.S. Territory or Possession.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites applications that seek to integrate two or more independent data sets to answer novel cancer control and prevention questions. The goal is to encourage applications that incorporate Integrative Data Analysis (IDA) methods to study behavioral risk factors for cancer, including tobacco use, sedentary behavior, poor weight management, and lack of medical adherence to screening and vaccine uptake. It is important that the data being integrated are from different sources and types (including both quantitative and qualitative; data may span different levels such as genetic and environmental) and should include at least one source of behavioral data. Importantly, applicants should use existing data sources rather than collect new data. In addition, creating harmonized measures, developing culturally sensitive measures, replicating results and cross-study comparisons will be encouraged.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-16-255.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

NIH OER Webmaster FBOWebmaster@OD.NIH.GOV
If you have any problems linking to this funding announcement, please contact the NIH OER Webmaster

Mechanism for Time-Sensitive Opportunity in Environmental Health Sciences (R21)

RFA-ES-16-005
Mechanism for Time-Sensitive Opportunity in Environmental Health Sciences (R21)
Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health14618298623_5b0befa780_o

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is intended to support research in environmental health science in which an event has or will imminently occur that provides a limited window of opportunity to collect samples and data to support the assessment of exposures and human health impact.  The goal of the program is to characterize initial exposures (measured either by sampling air, water, soil, etc.), collect human biological samples, or collect human health and exposure data in order to provide critical information to understand exposure-health outcome relationships, with the goal of providing data that will facilitate timely public health action to protect health.

The distinguishing features of an appropriate study are 1) the unforeseen nature of the event and 2) the need for rapid review and funding (substantially shorter than the typical NIH grant review/award cycle) in order for the scientific question to be approached and for the research design to be implemented. It should be clear that the event offers a limited opportunity to address unique and important research questions that could only be answered if the project is initiated with minimum delay.  Ideally, the results from the research funded by the time-sensitive R21 would lead to analyses of longer term health outcomes, although funding of these analyses would not be appropriate for this mechanism, but rather for future regular application processes.

An application submitted to this time-sensitive FOA will be considered only one time. Resubmission applications are not permitted.

This FOA encourages partnerships between researchers and the affected community (e.g., community-based organizations, environmental justice groups, local health and environmental agencies, worker organizations, etc.) as appropriate.

Applications seeking funds for the following are considered non-responsive to this announcement: 1) expansion of an existing study; 2) hazard remediation or cleanup; 3) studies of environmental hazards or chemical agents that alone do not impact human health; 4) estimating exposure to pathogens, and lastly studies proposing to use animals (e.g., pets, laboratory animals, or wildlife) as surrogates for human exposure.

Examples of appropriate studies include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Assessing short-term health impacts resulting from environmental exposures following a natural or man-made disaster, using biomarkers, survey instruments, medical assessments, or other appropriate methods. Examples might include acute toxic responses or exacerbation of existing diseases. Subjects in these studies could include local residents or early responders.
  • Collecting biospecimens and/or data on exposures to environmental agents immediately following a natural or man-made disaster to use in assessment of the effects of these exposures on short- or longer-term health outcomes.
  • Collecting data on the release of environmental toxicants that could result in exposures and consequently to adverse health outcomes.  Applications should discuss how these data might be used in health outcome or exposure research.
  • Examining the environmental health impact of rapid changes in policy or legislation that affect air or water treatment, content, and quality. For example, in an effort to improve air quality, a Department of Public Health issues a clean air mandate to convert heating oil to cleaner sources within 6 months. An application would be considered responsive in proposing to collect baseline and/or post levels of environmental and/or human biospecimens to examine the effects of changes to fine particulate matter.

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-ES-16-005
Funding Opportunity Title: Mechanism for Time-Sensitive Opportunity in Environmental Health Sciences (R21)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Opportunity Category Explanation:
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Environment
Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.113 — Environmental Health
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: May 03, 2016
Last Updated Date: May 03, 2016
Original Closing Date for Applications: Jun 01, 2019  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Jun 01, 2019  
Archive Date: Jul 02, 2019
Estimated Total Program Funding: $800,000
Award Ceiling: $200,000

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
City or township governments
Small businesses
State governments
Special district governments
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Independent school districts
Private institutions of higher education
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
County governments
Additional Information on Eligibility: Other Eligible Applicants include the following: Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions; Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISISs); Eligible Agencies of the Federal Government; Faith-based or Community-based Organizations; Hispanic-serving Institutions; Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Other than Federally Recognized); Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Organizations); Regional Organizations; Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) ; U.S. Territory or Possession.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is intended to support environmental health research in which an unpredictable event provides a limited window of opportunity to collect human biological samples or environmental exposure data. The primary motivation of the FOA is to understand the consequences of natural and man-made disasters or emerging environmental public health threats in the U.S. and abroad. A distinguishing feature of an appropriate study is the need for rapid review and funding (substantially shorter than the typical NIH grant review/award cycle) in order for the research question to be addressed and swiftly implemented. The shortened timeframe will be achieved by more frequent application due dates and expediting peer review, council concurrence and award issuance. The entire cycle, from submission to award, is expected to be within 3-4 months.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-ES-16-005.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

NIH OER Webmaster FBOWebmaster@OD.NIH.GOV
If you have any problems linking to this funding announcement, please contact the NIH OER Webmaster

NCI Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (NCI Omnibus R21)

NCI Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (NCI Omnibus R21)  Department of Health and Human Services  National Institutes of Health

Purposesupport_cancer_research

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA), issued by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), is to promote the early and conceptual stages of research efforts on novel scientific ideas that have the potential to substantially advance cancer research in all areas relevant to the mission of the NCI. By using the R21 mechanism, this FOA will support exploratory/developmental projects. These studies may involve considerable risk but may lead to a breakthrough in a particular area, and/or to the development of novel techniques, agents, methodologies, models, or applications that could have a major impact on a field of cancer research (biomedical, behavioral, or clinical).

Applications for R21 awards should describe projects distinct from those supported through the traditional R01 mechanism. For example, such projects could assess the feasibility of a novel area of investigation or a new experimental system that has the potential to enhance health-related research. Another example could include the unique and innovative use of an existing methodology to explore a new scientific area. Conversely, long-term projects, or projects designed to increase knowledge in a well-established area, should not be submitted as R21 applications.

Applications submitted under this mechanism should break new ground or extend previous discoveries toward new directions or applications. Projects of limited cost or scope that use widely accepted approaches and methods within well-established fields are better suited for the R03 small grant mechanism, which is presently also supported by the NCI Omnibus R03 FOA,PAR-14-007.

Specific Research Objectivescancer research ad2_0

All areas of cancer research relevant to the mission of the NCI are appropriate for projects submitted to this FOA (for a list of extramural research funding programs at the NCI, go tohttp://www.cancer.gov/researchandfunding/extramural). Proposed projects may involve basic, translational, clinical, and/or population research. Examples of relevant areas include but are not limited to studies of: cancer biology; cancer control; cancer diagnosis; cancer disparities; cancer prevention; and cancer treatment.

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-15-340
Funding Opportunity Title: NCI Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (NCI Omnibus R21)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Education
Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.393 — Cancer Cause and Prevention Research
93.394 — Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research
93.395 — Cancer Treatment Research
93.396 — Cancer Biology Research
93.399 — Cancer Control
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Sep 1, 2015
Creation Date: Sep 1, 2015
Original Closing Date for Applications: Nov 10, 2015  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Nov 10, 2015  
Archive Date: Dec 11, 2015
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $200,000
Award Floor:

ligibility

Eligible Applicants:
City or township governments
Special district governments
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Small businesses
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
State governments
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Private institutions of higher education
County governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Independent school districts
Additional Information on Eligibility: Other Eligible Applicants include the following: Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions; Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISISs); Eligible Agencies of the Federal Government; Faith-based or Community-based Organizations; Hispanic-serving Institutions; Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Other than Federally Recognized); Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Organizations); Regional Organizations; Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) ; U.S. Territory or Possession.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Exploratory/Developmental Grant (R21) funding opportunity supports the development of new research activities in all areas of cancer research. The R21 mechanism is intended to encourage exploratory and developmental research projects by providing support for the early and conceptual stages of these projects. These studies may involve considerable risk but may lead to a breakthrough in a particular area, or to the development of novel techniques, agents, methodologies, models, or applications that could have a major impact on a field of cancer research (biomedical, behavioral, or clinical).
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-15-340.html