“High” or “Medium” Priority AIDS Research on Non-AIDS-defining or AIDS-defining Cancers (R21)

PA-16-425
“High” or “Medium” Priority AIDS Research on Non-AIDS-defining or AIDS-defining Cancers (R21)
Department of Health and Human

Print Services
National Institutes of Health

Section I. Funding Opportunity Description
Purpose

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to continue advancing our understanding of the risks, development, progression, diagnosis, and treatment of malignancies observed in individuals with an underlying human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), particularly the non-AIDS defining malignancies which are now a leading cause of death in HIV-infected individuals.

This FOA encourages high or medium priority AIDS research in areas such as the study of the etiologic factors, cofactors, immunopathogenesis, diagnosis, and consequences of both non-AIDS defining and AIDS-defining malignancies in populations with an underlying HIV infection.

This FOA encourages research efforts that will (i) identify specific contributions resulting from HIV infection and its potential interaction with other pathogens for the development and pathogenesis of these cancers and (ii) provide information on the clinical outcomes of such cancers in the HIV-infected population.

Ultimately, such efforts could inform screening approaches and therapies targeted to the HIV-infected population.

This FOA utilizes the Exploratory/Developmental Grant (R21) mechanism, which supports investigation of novel scientific ideas or new model systems, tools, or technologies that have the potential for significant impact on biomedical or biobehavioral research. An R21 grant application need not have extensive background material or preliminary information.

This FOA runs in parallel with another FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-16-426, which utilizes the Exploratory/Developmental Grant (R01) mechanism.

Scope

In 2015, NIH and OAR mandated that in the future, AIDS funds can only be used in for research addressing “high” or “medium” priority areas of AIDS research as defined in NOT-OD-15-137“NIH HIV/AIDS Research Priorities and Guidelines for Determining AIDS Funding”.

Topics considered “low priority” AIDS in NOT-OD-15-137 are not appropriate for this PAR except basic research in tumors caused by KSHV has, for the moment, been considered as “high priority” AIDS and will be eligible for funding under this PAR.  All applications considered for funding will be reviewed by OAR and must be aligned with the priorities in NOT-OD-15-137.

Specific areas of study in the indicated categories may include, but are not limited to, the following examples:

A) Biomarkers, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics:

  • Discovery of reliable molecular and immunological diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and pathogen markers, useful for early detection, progression, or response to treatment of non-AIDS-defining and AIDS-defining malignancies;
  • Discovery and development of novel targets and efficacious new therapeutic agents, interventional strategies, or improved delivery systems for the treatment of cancer in people with HIV infection, however clinical trials are not permitted;
  • Studies to understand the pharmacokinetics of targeted therapies for AIDS-defining and non-AIDS defining malignancies in the context of highly active antiretroviral therapy and;
  • Studies utilizing existing cohorts and tissue banks of human specimens from a wide spectrum of AIDS-defining and non-AIDS defining malignancies to develop biomarker, diagnostic assays, or analyze samples and data acquired from these cohorts is encouraged. Examples of such cohorts and repositories include:
  • AIDS and Cancer Specimen Resource (ACSR),
  • Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS)),
  • Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS)
  • Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS).

Investigators are also encouraged to utilize infrastructure support of the Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) or NCI designated Cancer Centers if located at those institutions.

However, descriptive research and recruitment or retention of cohorts are not appropriate for this FOA.

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: PA-16-425
Funding Opportunity Title: “High” or “Medium” Priority AIDS Research on Non-AIDS-defining or AIDS-defining Cancers (R21)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Opportunity Category Explanation:  
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Education
Health
Category Explanation:  
Expected Number of Awards:  
CFDA Number(s): 93.121 — Oral Diseases and Disorders Research
93.393 — Cancer Cause and Prevention Research
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Version: Synopsis 1
Posted Date: Sep 07, 2016
Last Updated Date: Sep 07, 2016
Original Closing Date for Applications: Sep 07, 2019  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Sep 07, 2019  
Archive Date: Oct 08, 2019
Estimated Total Program Funding:  
Award Ceiling: $200,000
Award Floor:

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants: Special district governments
Small businesses
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
County governments
Independent school districts
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher education
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
State governments
City or township governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Additional Information on Eligibility: Other Eligible Applicants include the following: Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions; Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISISs); Eligible Agencies of the Federal Government; Faith-based or Community-based Organizations; Hispanic-serving Institutions; Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Other than Federally Recognized); Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Organizations); Regional Organizations; Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) ; U.S. Territory or Possession.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to continue advancing our understanding of the risks, development, progression, diagnosis, and treatment of malignancies observed in individuals with an underlying human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), particularly the non-AIDS defining malignancies which are now a leading cause of death in HIV-infected individuals. This FOA encourages high or medium priority AIDS research in areas such as the study of the etiologic factors, cofactors, immunopathogenesis, diagnosis, and consequences of both non-AIDS defining and AIDS-defining malignancies in populations with an underlying HIV infection.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-16-425.html
Grantor Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

NIH OER Webmaster FBOWebmaster@OD.NIH.GOV

If you have any problems linking to this funding announcement, please contact the NIH OER Webmaster

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Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Building Care and Prevention Capacity: Addressing the HIV Care Continuum in Southern Metropolitan Areas

 HRSA-16-187
Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Building Care and Prevention Capacity: Addressing the HIV Care Continuum in Southern Metropolitan Areas
Department of Health and Human Services
Health Resources and Services Administration

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 General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: HRSA-16-187
Funding Opportunity Title: Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Building Care and Prevention Capacity: Addressing the HIV Care Continuum in Southern Metropolitan Areas
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Opportunity Category Explanation:
Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement
Category of Funding Activity: Health
Category Explanation: https://grants.hrsa.gov/2010/Web2External/Interface/FundingCycle/ExternalView.aspx?fCycleID=2053c625-a5b7-41b6-93ff-4fadd741aa4d
Expected Number of Awards: 1
CFDA Number(s): 93.145 — AIDS Education and Training Centers
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: May 11, 2016
Last Updated Date: May 11, 2016
Original Closing Date for Applications: Jul 12, 2016  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Jul 12, 2016  
Archive Date: Sep 10, 2016
Estimated Total Program Funding: $1,000,000
Award Ceiling: $0
Award Floor: $0

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Additional Information on Eligibility: Eligible organizations may include public entities (including state, local, and Indian tribal governments); institutions of higher education; non-profit organizations (including faith-based, community-based, and tribal organizations); and academic health science centers involved in addressing HIV-related issues on a national level and within governmental public health structures.  Applicants must have a minimum four year history of developing and disseminating TA to RWHAP recipients and subrecipient providers.

Additional Information

Agency Name: Health Resources and Services Administration
Description: This announcement solicits applications for fiscal year (FY) 2016 to support a single organization that will serve as the Coordination and Technical Assistance Center (CTAC) for a new Secretary’s Minority AIDS Initiative Fund (SMAIF) program entitled Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP) Building Care and Prevention Capacity: Addressing the HIV Care Continuum in Southern Metropolitan Areas.  The purpose of this program is to implement innovative models of service delivery that result in improvements in RWHAP Part A jurisdictions’ HIV care continuum for minority populations.   The CTAC will provide technical assistance (TA) and service delivery funding to one subrecipient in each of four different RWHAP Part A jurisdictions located in the Southern U.S.  In order to broaden the impact, no more than two subrecipients shall be from Part A jurisdictions in a single state.  The goal of the project is increasing capacity to serve minority populations with a focus on men who have sex with men (MSM), youth, cisgender and transgender women, and people who inject drugs (PWID), resulting in improved health outcomes along the HIV care continuum.  The four subrecipients must be selected from the 18 RWHAP Part A jurisdictions located in the following states: Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.  Please note that a subrecipient under this cooperative agreement does not have to be a current RWHAP provider.  The project period is up to three (3) years.  For more information and a list of RWHAP Part A jurisdictions, please visit http://hab.hrsa.gov/abouthab/parta.html. Applicants must have a minimum four year history of developing and disseminating TA to RWHAP recipients and subrecipient providers, and are expected to collaborate with these partners in the development of this project. In collaboration with HRSA’s HAB, the CTAC will: Provide start-up and ongoing TA (onsite and virtual) to subrecipients located in four of the 18 RWHAP Part A jurisdictions in Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia on a wide range of programmatic activities that have potential to positively impact the HIV care continuum in each jurisdiction by reducing disparities among minority populations. Provide subawards to expand evidence-based/informed interventions, within a jurisdiction. Provide ongoing consultation on the use of subaward funds to help with start-up of new programming. Provide TA to increase the identification of newly diagnosed individuals and access points for entry into HIV care and prevention services among newly screened, newly identified and previously identified but out-of-care minority people living with HIV (PLWH). In coordination with HRSA’s HAB, collaborate with the HRSA Office of Regional Operations and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on any regional activities, through virtual and face-to-face meetings to provide opportunities for learning collaborative discussions. The CTAC will also collate and share information on a wide range of effective (evidence –based or informed) programmatic interventions.  This will include interventions that emanate from the HRSA HAB Special Projects of National Significance (SPNS) dissemination efforts, the CDC Effective Interventions Compendium, other efforts such as the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care (IAPAC) guidelines, interventions published in the peer-reviewed literature, and the recently concluded SMAIF-funded Care and Prevention in the United States (CAPUS) projects, many of which occurred in southern States.  It is also recommended that interventions considered include a “test and link” model (described in the methodology section), where individuals would move directly and almost immediately from their HIV test result to specific treatment or prevention interventions in a community or health setting.  Overall, this project could thus include a number of potential domains for use of subawards in programmatic implementation such as: Increasing HIV testing and linkage to care Increased testing and linkage to care for HIV/Hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection Increasing HIV treatment coverage Increasing retention in care and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and HCV curative treatment Increasing viral suppression Tailored approaches to certain minority populations of focus [MSM, youth, cisgender and transgender women, PWID]
Link to Additional Information:
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration SYoung@hrsa.gov
Contact Steven R. Young at (301)443-9091 or email SYoung@hrsa.gov

Seek, Test, Treat and Retain For Youth and Young Adults Living with or at High Risk for Acquiring HIV (R01)

RFA-DA-16-010
Seek, Test, Treat and Retain For Youth and Young Adults Living with or at High Risk for Acquiring HIV (R01)
Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health

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Section I. Funding Opportunity Description
Background

The “Seek, Test, Treat, and Retain” (STTR) approach to HIV prevention involves reaching out to high-risk, hard-to-reach groups who have not been recently tested for HIV (Seek), engaging them in HIV testing (Test), initiating, monitoring, and maintaining antiretroviral therapy (ART) for those testing HIV+ positive (Treat) and retaining patients in HIV and other relevant care (Retain) to impact HIV transmission on a population basis. The STTR paradigm has demonstrated efficacy in reducing HIV transmission at a population level among various key populations. Limited and inconsistent focus has been placed on the STTR paradigm among adolescents and young adults (defined in this RFA as 13-25 years of age) in the United States and internationally, particularly among substance using youth.  Youth generally are less likely to know their HIV status as compared to older populations. Consistent antiretroviral use and virologic suppression among adolescents and young adults are troublingly low as compared to adults in the US, with estimates that under 10% of all HIV+ youth are suppressed.  Similar findings have been observed in foreign settings.

Numerous individual and structural factors contribute to the challenges facing adolescent and young adult populations at risk for or living with HIV. If these factors are not addressed, the likelihood of STTR approaches making a difference in HIV incidence will be limited, at best. Younger populations at-risk for HIV may be members of groups that experience health care disparities, such as sexual minorities and, in the US, ethnic/racial minorities. High rates of substance use/abuse, particularly marijuana, alcohol, and stimulants, as well as are seen among youth in many locales and these are associated with risky sexual behavior (e.g., condomless sex) among both HIV- and HIV+ youth and young adults. Substance use prevention has demonstrated a  role in reducing HIV sexual risk and consequences such as sexual transmitted infections (STIs) is likely to serve as a facilitator of HIV treatment adherence. Youth may be more difficult to reach because adolescence and young adulthood are periods of transition, which may include repeated geographic moves, changes in educational or work status, and changing eligibility for entitlements and health insurance. HIV+ youth may transition from pediatric and adolescent health settings to adult health care settings with little systematic transfer of health records and clinical follow-up. Laws that govern the role of parents in the health care of youth and the autonomy of minors vary greatly within the US and across countries. These laws affect the ability of youth to seek HIV testing services, as well as services for substance use problems. Laws also may affect autonomy to participate in parts of STTR (e.g., initial screening and perhaps treatment of collateral, contributory problems such as STIs or substance abuse). Cultural norms may lead to parent or guardian involvement in health care decisions after youth reach majority in many places.  Therefore, involvement of parents and guardians needs to be a continuing consideration.

Because adolescents and young adults have not achieved full physical or cognitive maturity, linking and retaining HIV+ youth in care can be challenging. There is a dearth of HIV-specialty care geared toward adolescents and a lack of attention to their developmental needs. Where adolescent services exist there often is an absence of seamless transition to adult-based health care when they become adults. Beyond reproductive health care for young women, there is no systematic focus for routine and preventive health care among youth (regardless of HIV status) and young people realistically may perceive that they are at low risk for many of the most common chronic conditions like HIV, and may only engage health care for accidents or obvious clinical symptoms.

There are a small number of HIV or substance use providers who target youth, whereas most services are designed for adults. Simply promoting utilization of these adult-focused services by youth may fail to surmount the structural and other factors that govern the health behavior of younger people. Because youth may access HIV testing at community sites outside of the health care system, linkage between organizations that target and service youth (e.g., non-governmental organizations, social service, juvenile justice) and health care systems is important, as well as coordination of collateral services, as needed, for comorbid conditions that interfere with treatment adherence or virologic response (e.g., substance use disorders, STIs).

Research Objectives

The purpose of this FOA is to examine delivery models of HIV-focused services (testing, linkage, engagement and retention in care) for high risk or already HIV+ infected youth and young adults, with the ultimate goal of preventing HIV acquisition or onward transmission. Applications should incorporate substance use into study aims; objectives should address access to substance use prevention, screening, and/or treatment, as appropriate. Applications examining interventions that focus only on individual-level behavior and outcomes will be considered non-responsive, given the systemic and structural determinants of serostatus screening, treatment retention and viral suppression, which are the most striking areas of deficit among youth in the HIV continuum of care. The developmental, structural, and systemic factors related to serving youth need to be clearly incorporated into study aims, rather than simply refocusing existing interventions to younger people. Projects do not need to address the complete STTR continuum but should clearly address areas of particularly significant deficits for serving youth. Merely providing referrals to specialty care settings – without structural supports to ensure receipt of the referred service and ongoing coordination of care among service providers – is insufficient to be responsive to this FOA. Applications should demonstrate empirically that the target population is at high risk for HIV acquisition or has elevated rates of current HIV infection, and is therefore of high priority for testing, screening, or linkage. Integration of collateral services (e.g., substance use or STI treatment; prevention or early intervention for substance use) needs to be clearly integrated into the STTR framework, but should not be the primary focus of the study outcomes.

Because youth are likely to be early in their sexual development and can be exposed to the HIV virus over the course of years of subsequent sexual activity, it is imperative that projects that include screening also provide effective prevention modalities to HIV-negative youth. The purpose of this FOA is not to develop new prevention modalities, but projects are expected to incorporate, implement, and evaluate efficacious interventions with consideration to biologic as well as behavioral approaches. Projects should provide an evidence-based rationale for how their approach will lead to the expected outcomes, utilizing behavioral, social, organizational systems or other applicable theory.

Projects need not encompass the full age range covered by this FOA (ages 13-25) but a rationale should be provided for the age range that is chosen, and the components of the proposed project should be developmentally appropriate to that age group and their HIV and substance use epidemiology. Applicable laws regarding the participation of minors in research and clinical care vary widely, however, this should not preclude consideration of younger age groups, nor should it exclude consideration of parent or guardian roles among youth of any age.

Projects should take into account NIH HIV/AIDS research priorities http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-15-137.html

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-DA-16-010
Funding Opportunity Title: Seek, Test, Treat and Retain For Youth and Young Adults Living with or at High Risk for Acquiring HIV (R01)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Education
Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.279 — Drug Abuse and Addiction Research Programs
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Dec 8, 2015
Creation Date: Dec 8, 2015
Original Closing Date for Applications: Mar 2, 2016  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Mar 2, 2016  
Archive Date: Apr 2, 2016
Estimated Total Program Funding: $3,000,000
Award Ceiling:
Award Floor:

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Independent school districts
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
State governments
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Private institutions of higher education
Special district governments
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Small businesses
County governments
City or township governments
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Additional Information on Eligibility: Other Eligible Applicants include the following: Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions; Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISISs); Eligible Agencies of the Federal Government; Faith-based or Community-based Organizations; Hispanic-serving Institutions; Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Other than Federally Recognized); Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Organizations); Regional Organizations; Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) ; U.S. Territory or Possession.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to examine seek, test, treat and retain approaches among youth and young adults (ages 13-25) who are at high risk for HIV acquisition or have already acquired HIV. Applications should incorporate substance use into study aims; objectives should address substance use prevention, screening, and/or treatment in ways that facilitate use of HIV prevention and treatment services. Youth are the target of this RFA because they demonstrate lower levels of screening and engagement across the HIV continuum of care and HIV+ youth are less likely to achieve viral suppression than those at older ages. These disparities are evident in US and foreign populations. The developmental, structural, and systemic factors related to serving youth need to be clearly incorporated into study aims, rather than simple incremental refocusing of existing interventions to younger people. Both domestic and international projects will be supported
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-16-010.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

NIH OER Webmaster FBOWebmaster@OD.NIH.GOV
If you have any problems linking to this funding announcement, please contact the NIH OER Webmaster

Effects of Drugs of Abuse on Latent HIV Reservoirs in the CNS (R01)

RFA-DA-16-014
Effects of Drugs of Abuse on Latent HIV Reservoirs in the CNS (R01)
Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health

Section I. Funding Opportunity Description
Background

In response to the recently issued research priorities for AIDS funding, (NOT-OD-15-137), NIDA is interested in high-priority basic and systems-level approaches for advancing our understanding of CNS HIV latency and reservoirs in the context of substance abuse and addiction.

One of the major barriers to eradication of HIV-1 is the persistence of the latently-infected cells located in the different regions of the body. Viral latency is most likely governed by transcriptional silencing of the viral promoter. While the predominant viral reservoir is thought to be resting CD4(+) T cells in the blood, other anatomical compartments including the CNS, gut-associated lymphoid tissue, bone marrow, and genital tract can also harbor persistently infected cellular reservoirs of HIV-1. While ART has been successful in controlling viral replication, leading to undetectable viremia in patients, it does not affect latent virus integrated into host cell DNA. Researchers have employed various strategies to eradicate viral reservoirs, but to date, none have been successful. In order to improve and refine strategies for the eradication of HIV reservoirs it is important to fully understand the characteristics of HIV latency, and to understand the effects of drugs of abuse on the molecular mechanisms underlying latency.

Current research suggests that latent viral reservoirs are present in the CNS, but many questions remain. The CNS has several unique features compared to other reservoirs. There are no resident T cells in the brain; the virus resides in macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes where the viral infection is non-cytopathic; the virus evolves in the brain; and since the turnover rate of these cells is low, the virus has the potential to reside in these cells for several decades and possibly for the life of the individual. In addition, despite the use of ART for long periods of time, low levels of viral replication, immune activation, and inflammation persist in the CNS and these factors may be responsible for the development of asymptomatic and/or mild neurocognitive impairments reported in HIV-infected patients even with ART. Importantly, drugs of abuse have been shown to exacerbate pathogenesis of neurocognitive impairments in HIV-infected patients. Therefore, a clear understanding of the cell types in which the virus resides in the CNS, the mechanisms of viral persistence, restricted replication and latency, the turnover rate of the infected cells, and how drugs of abuse affect these parameters is critical to develop strategies to treat and eradicate CNS HIV reservoirs or induce irreversible suppression of viral DNA transcription in drug-abusing populations.

It has been proposed that during early infection HIV enters the CNS but it is important to know how soon HIV enters the brain as timing of viral entry may impact the initiation of viral latency. Although transmigration of HIV-infected monocytes through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a generally accepted mechanism of HIV CNS entry, the exact mechanisms of viral entry into CNS are not clear. Do other peripheral immune cells participate in the transport of HIV into the CNS? Is the CNS initially colonized by free virus or by infected cells which subsequently release virus into CNS and CSF? Integrated HIV-1 provirus has been detected in perivascular macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes; productive HIV infection occurs in perivascular macrophages and microglia, but in astrocytes the infection is restricted and does not give rise to new viral particles.

Drugs of abuse add another layer of complexity in our understanding of CNS HIV latency as they have potential to impact HIV latency directly or indirectly at different stages of HIV infection and progression, including initiation, establishment, and maintenance. Drugs of abuse can affect BBB permeability, which may modulate the timing and extent of viral CNS entry. Substance abuse has been shown to decrease adherence to ART drugs and consequently impair their efficacy in the suppression of viral replication. Various substances of abuse can impact systemic and localized inflammation. For example, cocaine and methamphetamine can trigger inflammatory changes in macrophages and microglia and opioids may stimulate inflammation in brain and gut. Thus, abused substances could have an impact on the size and distribution of HIV reservoirs.

Research Objectives

Proposed projects MUST include the following:

  • A focus on HIV latency and viral reservoirs in the CNS. Proposed projects may be conducted in humans, animals, or in vitro model systems
  • At least one aim or sub-aim must involve exposure to substances of abuse, such as including analysis of samples from exposed subjects or animals or drug studies using in vitro model systems.

Other application considerations:

  • Newly-formed collaborations to foster sharing of expertise between the fields of HIV/AIDS and drug abuse, and other relevant fields are encouraged.
  • This FOA utilizes the R01 mechanism and is appropriate for projects that can support the proposed aims either with appropriate preliminary data or relevant related work by the investigative team.  Applicants lacking significant preliminary data may wish to de-risk the proposed project by submitting an R01 application of shorter duration (e.g. 2-3 years) commensurate with the higher risk of such a project.

Topics appropriate for this FOA include but not are limited to the following:

  • Investigate how soon HIV enters CNS after initial infection, what are the mechanisms of viral entry, and how drugs of abuse influence these parameters.
  • Investigate whether CNS is initially colonized by free virus or by infected cells which subsequently release virus into CNS and CSF. Can drugs of abuse modulate these parameters?
  • Identify which CNS cells harbor latent HIV in different anatomical compartments (e.g., dopamine rich vs. dopamine deficient) in the presence and absence of drugs of abuse
  • Determine the turnover rates of CNS cells harboring latent HIV in different compartments. Do drugs of abuse modulate turnover rates of these cells?
  • Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms of the initiation, establishment, and maintenance of HIV latency in CNS cells and do they differ in different cells and different CNS compartments?
  • Do drugs of abuse interfere with the initiation, establishment and maintenance of the latent HIV in the CNS? If yes, what are the mechanisms?
  • How is viral latency established in the CNS? Factors such as reduced basal transcriptional activity of viral promoters and increased expression of transcriptional repressors have been proposed to contribute to viral latency but confirmation is required.
  • Does CNS harbor functional HIV reservoirs defined as those hosting replication-competent virus capable of producing new virus particles that can infect new susceptible cells? Using in vivo and in vitro techniques, investigate the presence of functional CNS HIV reservoirs.

Use of novel methods for studying the mechanisms of HIV latency in the context of drugs of abuse:

  • Develop biomarkers to identify and quantify CNS HIV reservoirs
  • Real time monitoring of viral reservoirs using imaging techniques
  • Use genome editing tools (e.g., CRISPR, TALEN, Zinc Finger) to determine how drugs of abuse alter mechanisms of viral latency

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-DA-16-014
Funding Opportunity Title: Effects of Drugs of Abuse on Latent HIV Reservoirs in the CNS (R01)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Education
Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.279 — Drug Abuse and Addiction Research Programs
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Dec 8, 2015
Creation Date: Dec 8, 2015
Original Closing Date for Applications: Mar 3, 2016  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Mar 3, 2016  
Archive Date: Apr 3, 2016
Estimated Total Program Funding: $3,000,000
Award Ceiling:
Award Floor:

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Small businesses
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
City or township governments
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Special district governments
County governments
Private institutions of higher education
Independent school districts
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
State governments
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Additional Information on Eligibility: Other Eligible Applicants include the following: Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions; Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISISs); Eligible Agencies of the Federal Government; Faith-based or Community-based Organizations; Hispanic-serving Institutions; Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Other than Federally Recognized); Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Organizations); Regional Organizations; Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) ; U.S. Territory or Possession.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: The purpose of this FOA is to promote research to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms by which HIV latency is initiated, established, and maintained in the CNS and to determine how drugs of abuse modulate HIV latency and the size and persistence of CNS HIV reservoirs. The ultimate goal is to obtain information for developing new or improved therapies for HIV treatment in drug-abusing populations.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-16-014.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

NIH OER Webmaster FBOWebmaster@OD.NIH.GOV
If you have any problems linking to this funding announcement, please contact the NIH OER Webmaster

B Cell Immunology Program for HIV-1 Vaccine Development (BCIP) (R01)

B Cell Immunology Program for HIV-1 Vaccine Development (BCIP) (R01)maxresdefault

Research Objectives

Emerging research findings about B cell biology need to be harnessed for developing rationally-designed vaccines against HIV-1. This FOA will support mechanistic studies with the goal of informing novel immunization strategies for generating optimal/preferable B cell responses against HIV-1.

This FOA will also support studies focused on acquiring a deeper understanding of the mechanisms by which current HIV-1 vaccine platforms induce Ab responses and the development of strategies to improve these responses. HIV-1 vaccine research is entering a time of great opportunity, and integrated approaches that dissect the mechanisms governing vaccine-induced, antigen-specific immune responses in humans will be valuable in developing an effective HIV-1 vaccine.

Specific Areas of Research Interest

This FOA is restricted to hypothesis-driven mechanistic studies. Applicants are strongly encouraged to contact, well in advance of submission, the Scientific/Research Contact  to discuss the appropriateness of the scope of the proposed project.

Areas of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Acquire a better understanding of the consequences of modulating innate and/or T cell pathways on the humoral immune response against HIV-1.
  • Explore approaches to direct B cell fate for the generation of long-term memory and persistent Ab production.  Examples may include previously established adjuvants, immunomodulators, and antigen delivery systems, either alone or in combination.
  • Identify ways to induce and maintain B cell lineages in relevant anatomical niches following vaccination against HIV-1.
  • Acquire an understanding of the relationship between the subpopulations of B cells generated during vaccination and affinity maturation or the durability of the anti-HIV-1 Ab response.
  • Studies that benchmark the response to HIV-1 immunogens against the response to other infectious agents or model systems.
  • Studies that employ multiparametric analysis (e.g. specificity, class, affinity, post-translational modifications) for profiling Ab responses to HIV-1 immunogens and the application of this knowledge to regulate desirable B cell responses in improved HIV-1 vaccine platforms.
  • Acquire an understanding of the antigenic variation, vaccine design (e.g. protein vs. DNA vs. live vector) and immunization strategies (e.g. prime-boost, differential dosing and number of immunizations, and intervals) for programming Ag-specific B cells at prime and/or during recall.
  • Studies designed to harness the role of B cells in regulating T cell immunity against HIV-1.
  • Studies to modulate desirable Ab-effector functions with durable protective properties against HIV-1 acquisition.
  • Studies exploring immunocomplexes for the maturation of the antibody response against HIV-1.

SOURCE: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Letter of Intent: 2/17/16. Application: 3/17/16 by 5 pm local time of applicant organization.
$ AVAILABLE: NIAID intends to commit $2 million in FY2017 to fund two to three awards.
ELIGIBILITY: * Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education.
* Hispanic-serving institutions.
* Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).
* Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs).
* Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions.
* Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs).
* Nonprofits with or without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education).
* Small businesses.
* For-profit organizations (other than small businesses).
* State governments.
* County governments.
* City or township governments.
* Special district governments.
* Indian/Native American tribal governments (federally recognized and other than federally recognized).
* Eligible agencies of the federal government.
* U.S. territories or possessions.
* Independent school districts.
* Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities.
* Native American tribal organizations (other than federally recognized tribal governments).
* Faith-based or community-based organizations.
* Regional organizations.
* Non-domestic (non-U.S.) entities (foreign institutions).
PURPOSE: The objective of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to solicit hypothesis-driven, multidisciplinary research to elucidate the complexities and developmental plasticity of B cells associated with the induction of potent, durable, adaptive immune responses against HIV-1.
CFDA: 93.855, 93.856
CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts.

For more information see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AI-15-055.html
From CDC National Prevention Information Network’s (NPIN) HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Funding Information email, 10/29/15icon
Subject(s) HIV/AIDS research

Supporting the National Blood Transfusion Service (NBTS) in the implementation and expansion of Blood Safety activities in the Republic of Zambia under the President’s Emergency plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)

CDC-RFA-GH16-1709
Supporting the National Blood Transfusion Service (NBTS) in the implementation and expansion of Blood Safety activities in the Republic of Zambia under the President’s Emergency plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)
Department of Health and Human ServicesSHARMAINE-Byrne-Mwenda-blood-donor-donation-ZNBTS-Joseph-Mulenga
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

FOA Summary

The purpose of this FOA is to support the Zambia National Blood Transfusion Service (NBTS) in the provision of safe and adequate supply of blood and blood products to health facilities in Zambia. This support will cover a one year period as the institution transitions to full host government support. In particular, the funding will support activities to improve blood donations from repeat, regular voluntary non-remunerated donors (VNRD); to ensure safety through a centralized testing system by the Zambia National Blood Transfusion Services; and to promote appropriate use of blood and blood components. It will also link with other HIV prevention activities through integration of prevention education in youth and adult donor recruitment and in notification of donor test results with appropriate referral to care and treatment services. The NBTS will also support, coordinate and guide the activities of all other partners involved in mobilization and retention of volunteer blood donors.
The ZNBTS will work in collaboration with the HHS/CDC Zambia office and the Zambian MOH, to achieve program outcomes. All activities implemented under this program should follow national policies and guidelines for the delivery of Blood Safety interventions. The recipient will work in collaboration with the Zambian MOH, the U.S. Government in-country Emergency Plan team, and the HHS/CDC Zambia office to improve the breadth, scale, and quality of the Blood Safety program (including mobilization of low-risk, voluntary non-remuneratedblood donors, blood collection, transport through the cold chain, testing for transfusion transmissible infections (HIV, HBV, HCV, syphilis) at quality assured laboratories, establishment of national quality system, including guidelines, standard operating procedures, accurate records, monitoring and evaluation, distribution of blood and blood products to the health facilities, coordinate and monitor the appropriate clinical use of blood and outcomes of transfusion (hemovigilance) and the establishment of a comprehensive quality system covering the entire transfusion process, from donor recruitment to the follow-up of recipients of transfusion).
The emphasis is to have quality systems in place while at the same time implementing evidence based strategies and improving on program management and evaluation (M&E). Since children below five years and women of reproductive age receive approximately two thirds of the national blood collections, the preparation of pediatric blood packs will be a significant component of blood safety activities.
In addition to program implementation, ZNBTS should continue to develop methods to create and build the capacity of its own and other organizations responsible for blood safety and transfusion services.
The ZNBTS will seek to obtain final government commitment for its own support and recognition as a separate unit with an adequate budget, necessary legislation/regulation, management team, and the formation of an organization with responsibility and authority for the ZNBTS. Additionally, the ZNBTS will foster development and implementation of a budgeting and finance system to ensure a sustainable blood program through cost recovery and/or annual budget allocation.
The ZNBTS must promote sustainability with continued, high-quality and evidence based interventions through local and indigenous organizations in collaboration with the Zambian MOH. In particular it should build the local indigenous capacity to be able to carry out various blood safety related interventions. NBTS will demonstrate increased financial support of blood transfusion services and this should be evident though increased donor mobilization, continued staff training and improved high-quality testing and processing of blood.
The ZNBTS will work with other Emergency Plan partners if necessary to evaluate and explore donor recruitment and cost effective strategies.
To avoid the overdependence on a sole donor, the recipient will be expected to diversify the funding base by applying and managing additional grants from other international development and funding agencies.
The overall outcome is to increase the supply of safe blood for transfusion to sufficient levels in the next one year to prevent biomedical transmission of HIV (and other transfusion transmissible infections [TTIs]).

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: CDC-RFA-GH16-1709
Funding Opportunity Title: Supporting the National Blood Transfusion Service (NBTS) in the implementation and expansion of Blood Safety activities in the Republic of Zambia under the President’s Emergency plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement
Category of Funding Activity: Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards: 1
CFDA Number(s): 93.067 — Global AIDS
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Oct 26, 2015
Creation Date: Oct 26, 2015
Original Closing Date for Applications: Dec 26, 2015  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Dec 26, 2015  
Archive Date: Jan 25, 2016
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $1,353,644
Award Floor: $0

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Additional Information on Eligibility: Zambia National Blood Transfusion Service (ZNBTS)

Additional Information

Agency Name: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Description: To ensure adequacy and equitable access to cost effective and affordable safe blood and blood products throughout the country, in accordance with the set goals, objectives and targets, CDC intends through this FOA to provide funding support to the Government mandated institution to collect, screen, and distribute blood and blood products to health facilities; with the ultimate goals of reducing child mortality, improving maternal health and combating HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases.
Link to Additional Information:  http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=279838
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

Technical Information Management Section Department of Health and Human Services CDC Procurement and Grants Office 2920 Brandywine Road, MS E-14 Atlanta, GA 30341 Telephone: 770-488-2700
pgotim@cdc.gov

For more grant funding opportunities like this one please see:

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=279839

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=279840

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=279841

PEPFAR Small Grants Program 2015-2016, U.S. Embassy Maseru [Communities Affected by AIDS/HIV]

DOS-MSU-PFSGP-FY16
PEPFAR Small Grants Program 2015-2016, U.S. Embassy Maseru
Department of State
U.S. Mission to Maseru-Lesotho

Everyone is Lesotho is either infected or affected by HIV/AIDS.

HL-Youth-AIDS-Day-Seotlong-Centre-2

Source: http://www.helplesotho.org/lesotho/hivaids-in-lesotho/

Criteria for Funding

Consideration will only be given to projects which:

  • Address the needs of OVC and/or support community-based HIV and AIDS palliative care and home health care
  • Have at least eight project members
  • Improve basic economic or social conditions at the local community or village level
  • Support high impact, quick implementation activities that benefit a substantial number of people within one year without requiring further assistance or funding
  • Are oriented toward communities, not individuals
  • Involve at least a 10% contribution of cash, labor, or materials by members of the local community
  • Are within the ability of the local community to operate and maintain
  • Are managed and run by local Basotho groups, e.g. community-based organizations, faith-based organizations and/or groups of people living with HIV or AIDS
  • Can be measured through tangible results and reports, e.g. number of people supported and/or trained
  • Are a direct response to the initiative and aspirations of the local community

Grant Conditions

PEPFAR Small Grants program funds can be used for:

  • Home-based caregiver kits and medical supplies
  • Training for caregivers and care providers
  • Equipment for OVC centers
  • Educational materials and training supplies
  • Equipment, materials and technical training for income-generation projects
  • Ongoing administrative or operating costs (but no more than 10% of total requested funds budget)
  • Structured and measurable prevention and awareness campaigns, workshops and outreach sessions

PEPFAR Small Grants program funds cannot be used for:

  • Remodeling or renovating an existing facility that is in disrepair as a result of neglect or lack of money
  • Projects managed by private businesses, private crèches or public schools
  • Food and food parcels
  • School uniforms, school fees or student bursaries
  • Salaries and/or personal expenses
  • Motorized vehicles or tractors
  • Pesticides, fungicides, and herbicides
  • Office equipment such as computers, fax machines, or photocopiers
  • Military activities (including those relating to police, prisons or other law enforcement activities)
  • Activities with unmitigated and negative environmental consequences, e.g. dams or forest roads 

Measurable Results Requirement

PEPFAR Small Grants program funds can only be used for projects which are able to measure and report on how they contribute to HIV/AIDS and OVC care.  Projects must be able to count or describe the following on a quarterly basis:

Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) Projects

  • Services provided (e.g. healthcare, shelter, child protection, HIV and AIDS prevention education)
  • Number of children served
  • Number of providers and/or caregivers trained

Community-based Palliative and Home Care Projects

  • Number of individuals provided with general HIV-related palliative and home care
  • Type of care provided (such as physical, spiritual, psychological, or social support)
  • Number of caregivers trained to provide general HIV-related palliative and home care

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: DOS-MSU-PFSGP-FY16
Funding Opportunity Title: PEPFAR Small Grants Program 2015-2016, U.S. Embassy Maseru
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Health
Category Explanation: Health, HIV/AIDS, Orphan and Vulnerable Children (OVC)
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 19.029 — The U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief Programs
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

Posted Date:Oct 22, 2015

Creation Date:Oct 22, 2015

Original Closing Date for Applications:Jan 31, 2016 

 Current Closing Date for Applications:Jan 31, 2016 

 Archive Date:Mar 1, 2016

Estimated Total Program Funding:$150,000

Award Ceiling:$25,000

Award Floor:$5,000
Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Additional Information on Eligibility: All applicants must be non-profit local community based organizations that address the needs of orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) and/or support community based HIV and AIDS care initiatives.

Additional Information

Agency Name: U.S. Mission to Maseru-Lesotho
Description: Funded by the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, PEPFAR. The PEPFAR Small Grants Program is for community initaited projects which aim to strengthen health services in communities affected by HIV and AIDS. The program supports projects that support and protect vulnerable children (OVC) and adolecents, and community based HIV and AIDS care initiatives. The funds can only be used for projects which are able to measure and report on how they contribute to HIV and AIDS, and OVC care. The U.S. Embassy Maseru will prioritize proposals that present creative, original and innovative ideas and that improve basic economi or social conditions at the local community or village level.
Link to Additional Information: http://maseru.usembassy.gov/pepfar-small-grants-program.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

Special Projects Office, U.S. Embassy Maseru +266 2231 2666
grantsmaseru@state.gov