Genome Sequencing Center for the Gabriella Miller Kids First Pediatric Research Program (U24)

RFA-RM-16-001
Genome Sequencing Center for the Gabriella Miller Kids First Pediatric Research Program (U24)
Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health

Gabriella-Miller21

Introduction

In response to The Gabriella Miller Kids First Act (https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/113/hr2019/text), NIH, through the Common Fund, has established the Gabriella Miller Kids First Pediatric Research Program (Kids First Program).  This program is intended to support a ten-year effort to develop an integrated Gabriela Miller Kids First Pediatric Data Resource (Kids First Data Resource) populated by genomic and phenotypic data that will be of high value for the pediatric research community.  This resource will allow data mining across diverse conditions to uncover shared developmental pathways.  The overall goal is to help researchers understand the underlying mechanisms of disease, leading to more refined diagnostic capabilities and ultimately more targeted therapies or interventions.

As the first step toward building the Kids First Data Resource, the Kids First Program published the Funding Opportunity Announcement, PAR-15-259, “Discovery of the Genetic Basis of Structural Birth Defects and of Childhood Cancers: Gabriella Miller Kids First Pediatric Research Program (X01)”, to solicit project/sample proposals to use whole genome sequencing to investigate the genetics of structural birth defects and the genetic contributions to childhood cancers.  Future calls will be published to continue the solicitation of similar types of projects and samples, pending availability of funds.

This FOA invites applications for sequencing center(s) that will produce whole genome sequence and variant data from the solicited samples (X01 samples) to contribute to the Kids First Data Resource.  It is funded through the NIH Common Fund, which supports cross-cutting programs that are expected to have exceptionally high impact. All Common Fund initiatives invite investigators to develop bold, innovative, and often risky approaches to address problems that may seem intractable or to seize new opportunities that offer the potential for rapid progress.

Goals

The goals of this FOA are as follows:

  • Generation of whole genome sequence data and variant data from cohorts for structural birth defects and childhood cancers that the Kids First Program will provide.
  • Submission of sequence and variant data to the controlled public database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP), and databases that may be designated by the Kids First Program, and providing the same data to the project/sample Program Directors/Principal Investigators (PDs/PIs) (X01 PDs/PIs).
  • Coordination with X01PDs/PIs who will submit the phenotypic data of the sequenced samples to the same databases.

The FOA expects high quality sequence and variant data to be generated from the largest number of cases and samples possible with available funds.  It is anticipated that costs will decrease over the course of the award while data quality is maintained or improved, so the number of cases that can be sequenced and analyzed per dollar spent is expected to increase.

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-RM-16-001
Funding Opportunity Title: Genome Sequencing Center for the Gabriella Miller Kids First Pediatric Research Program (U24)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement
Category of Funding Activity: Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.310 — Trans-NIH Research Support
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Jan 13, 2016
Creation Date: Jan 13, 2016
Original Closing Date for Applications: Mar 31, 2016  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Mar 31, 2016  
Archive Date: May 1, 2016
Estimated Total Program Funding: $12,600,000
Award Ceiling: $12,600,000
Award Floor:

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
City or township governments
County governments
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Private institutions of higher education
State governments
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Special district governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Additional Information on Eligibility: See full announcement for complete details.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to establish one or two centers that can rapidly generate high quality whole genome sequence and variant data from a large number of human specimens representing two types of pediatric conditions – structural birth defects and childhood cancers. The generated data will become a part of a data resource under The Gabriella Miller Kids First Pediatric Research Program, which will allow researchers to investigate the genetic etiology of structural birth defects, and to further elucidate the genetic contribution to childhood cancers.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-16-001.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

eRA Service Desk Monday to Friday 7 am to 8 pm ET http://grants.nih.gov/support/ Phone 1-866-504-9552
Grants Info

Innovative Questions in Symptom Science and Genomics (R21)

PA-16-023
Innovative Questions in Symptom Science and Genomics (R21)DNAstethoscopesmaller
Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health

Research Objectives

Symptom Science

  • What are the biological and behavioral dynamics of symptoms (e.g., dyspnea, fatigue, impaired sleep/insomnia, pain, depression) that can change the trajectory of chronic illnesses, and how can the dynamics be optimized and maintained to prevent symptom relapse?
  • What innovative care delivery models (e.g. interdisciplinary, family-based), research methods (e.g. community engaged research, pragmatic trials) and technologies (e.g. eHealth) can be leveraged to improve symptom management and change the chronic illness trajectory especially among individuals who experience disparate health outcomes?
  • How do lifestyle factors, environmental conditions, symptom clusters and symptom treatments impact quality of life and symptom management in different chronic conditions?
  • How do symptom precursors (e.g. biomarkers or conditions such as obesity) contribute to the physiology of symptom risk, severity, duration and response to treatment?
  • What are the ‘omic’, phenotypic and state dependent indicators related to the mechanism, assessment and management of high impact symptoms (e.g. pain, fatigue, dyspnea) and what is the added value of these indicators beyond clinical parameters in explaining physical and psychological symptoms in both patients and their informal caregivers?
  • What are the common mechanistic pathways (e.g. stimulus to perception, perception to report) that can distinguish underlying symptom cluster trajectories that are amenable to intervention at various points along those pathways?
  •  What are the personalized markers (e.g. biomarkers and clinical factors) that can be used to stratify subgroups of patients with different patterns among symptoms to determine the symptom management strategies most effective in improving quality of life?
  • What innovative methodologies (e.g. modeling) can be used to analyze symptom management algorithms to identify the interventions most likely to be successful in clinical or pragmatic trials?
  • How can we create a standardized, feasible, valid, and relevant data and technology infrastructure to routinely collect and aggregate symptom data from patient health records but also from other types of assessments (biological, physiological, performance) to inform clinical care and research?
  • What are the biological indicators that can help determine the presence and severity of subjective symptoms in individuals who cannot self-report (e.g. small children; individuals with cognitive decline) to help improve clinical assessment and management? Is there a role for fMRI?
  • What state-of-the-art research designs/methods (e.g. mixed methods, SMART, MOST) should investigators use to test personalized symptom management strategies to include scalable interventions?
  • What are the biologic, physiologic and/or omic mechanisms underlying symptoms and patient outcomes?
  • Based on individual omics, environmental factors, and behavior what are the most effective and targeted interventions that can be expedited for translation to reduce risk and promote health?
  • What are the relative contributions of omic markers and phenomic data in predicting individual responses to therapeutic interventions that improve patient outcomes such as quality of life?
  • For high risk patients who are at the end of life, how can genetic assessment and DNA banking be used to address familial risk?
  • How should omic discoveries be used to create and test technologies (such as clinical tools) that can be used to diagnose clinical problems, predict the clinical course and promote optimal outcomes?
  • In what ways can genomic information be used to promote adherence and improve self-management of chronic conditions?
  • How does the social environment interact with gene expression to influence resilience in coping with life challenges?
  • The evolution and vitality of the biomedical sciences require a constant infusion of new ideas, techniques, and points of view. These may differ substantially from current thinking or practice and may not yet be supported by substantial preliminary data. By using the R21 mechanism, the NIH seeks to foster the introduction of novel scientific ideas, model systems, tools, agents, targets, and technologies that have the potential to substantially advance biomedical research.

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: PA-16-023
Funding Opportunity Title: Innovative Questions in Symptom Science and Genomics (R21)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Education
Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.361 — Nursing Research
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Oct 30, 2015
Creation Date: Oct 30, 2015
Original Closing Date for Applications: Jan 7, 2019  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Jan 7, 2019  
Archive Date: Feb 7, 2019
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $200,000
Award Floor:

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Small businesses
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Special district governments
Private institutions of higher education
City or township governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Independent school districts
County governments
State governments
Additional Information on Eligibility: Other Eligible Applicants include the following: Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions; Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISISs); Eligible Agencies of the Federal Government; Faith-based or Community-based Organizations; Hispanic-serving Institutions; Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Other than Federally Recognized); Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Organizations); Regional Organizations; Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) ; U.S. Territory or Possession.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: This initiative seeks to optimize innovation, insight and cutting edge conceptual and technological breakthroughs by catalyzing research that emanates from the identified innovative questions in symptom and genomic nursing science. These innovative questions are reflective of broad domains from which more specific novel hypotheses or problems to be solved can be derived.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-16-023.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

NIH OER Webmaster FBOWebmaster@OD.NIH.GOV
If you have any problems linking to this funding announcement, please contact the NIH OER Webmaster

For More Grant Opportunities on this Topic please See:

R01: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=279905

R15: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=279906

Novel Nucleic Acid Sequencing Technology Development (R43/R44)

Novel Nucleic Acid Sequencing Technology Development (R43/R44)
Department of Health and Human Servicesimages
National Institutes of Health

Purpose

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA)  seeks R43/R44 SBIR grant applications from small businesses to develop novel technologies that will enable at least one order of magnitude improvement in DNA sequencing, and practical methods for direct RNA sequencing.  Advances in genomics and more broadly in biomedical research have been greatly facilitated by significant and sustained DNA sequencing throughput increases and cost decreases.  The goal now is to improve the quality and efficiency of DNA sequencing and enable direct RNA sequencing (e.g., longer read lengths, faster turn-around time, greater accuracy, and higher-throughput etc.) at reasonable costs with the anticipation that significant advances in any of these and related areas would make significant contributions to the mission of NHGRI and the field of genomics, including to many of NHGRI’s other technology development goals.

Background

The ability to sequence large and ever growing numbers of complete genomes and transcriptomes coupled with the free dissemination of sequence data have dramatically changed the nature of biological and biomedical research.  DNA and direct RNA sequence in combination with other genomic data have the potential to lead to remarkable improvement in many facets of human life and society, including the understanding, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease; advances in agriculture, environmental science and remediation; and our understanding of evolution and ecological systems.

The ability to sequence many genomes and transcriptomes has been made possible by the enormous reduction of the cost of sequencing in the past three decades, from tens of dollars per base in the 1980s to a small fraction of a cent per base today.  Technology advances, and in particular the development of a new generation of sequencing systems, have enabled the launch of many projects that are producing stunning insights into biology and disease.  Nevertheless, the cost to completely sequence very large numbers of entire genomes of individual cells or people remains very high, and we remain far from achieving the low costs and high quality needed to enable the use of comprehensive genomic and transcriptomic sequence information in individual health care.

One of the major contributions by NHGRI has been in the genomic technology domain.  Those efforts have been so transformative that it is hard to remember genomics without, for example, a reference human genome, inexpensive short-read sequencing, efficient bacterial artificial chromosome methods, microarrays, defined common human haplotypes, single molecule sequencing, and many other significant technical advances.  Bright prospects for future success motivate investing in genomic technology development specifically for novel sequencing methodologies.

Objectives

NHGRI seeks to fund research efforts in novel chemistries, physical approaches and instrumentation for DNA and direct RNA sequencing.  New methodologies and substantial advances beyond existing approaches are sought that would, if successful, significantly propel forward the field of genomics.  Applicants may propose work on DNA or direct RNA sequencing, or both, in a single application.

The FOA deliberately does not specify cost, quality, throughput or read lengths since achievable endpoints are likely to improve over the life of the opportunity, and applicants are encouraged to optimize and balance these key attributes for the technology approach proposed.  It is expected that awardees will develop scientific and practical definitions of optimal cost, quality and read lengths relative to enabling significant genomics opportunities. Priority will be given to applications that propose improvements of at least an order of magnitude (based on state of the art at the time the application is submitted); such improvements may be achieved by focusing on one critical factor, or a combination of important ones.

For DNA sequencing, novel methods that generate large numbers of long reads of high quality with a low cost are sought.  New physical or chemical detection methods for sequencing are especially encouraged along with substantive (at least an order of magnitude) improvement to current high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies.  Those methods that yield novel sequence based insights or that solve existing limitations in the field (e.g., de novo assembly of human genomes, base modification determination, complete and quantitative sequencing of all the DNA in a sample, essentially complete genomes of single cells, very small quantities of starting material down to a single cell, very long reads of at least 150Kb, etc.) are of especially high interest.

For RNA sequencing, the need is for quantitative and high-throughput direct sequencing of entire transcripts from the transcriptome.  Awardees are expected to develop novel methods for quantitatively assessing the sequence of full length RNA without a cDNA intermediate.  Enabling new approaches to RNA analysis is a key goal of direct RNA sequencing (e.g., exhaustive sequencing of every RNA molecule in a sample or precise quantification across the entire very high dynamic range of RNA transcripts, determination of base modifications, determining RNA secondary structural elements while sequencing, cost-effective and statistically-robust single cell transcriptomics, etc.).

High-risk and high-reward proposed research may plan to develop complete systems or novel key components for nucleic acid sequencing.  Very novel physical or chemical approaches to sequencing are solicited along with novel enzymatic methodologies.  The technology developed can either develop an entirely new way of sequencing or significantly improve existing sequencing methodology.

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-HG-15-033
Funding Opportunity Title: Novel Nucleic Acid Sequencing Technology Development (R43/R44)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.172 — Human Genome Research
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Aug 17, 2015
Creation Date: Aug 17, 2015
Original Closing Date for Applications: Aug 27, 2017  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Aug 27, 2017  
Archive Date: Sep 27, 2017
Estimated Total Program Funding: $2,000,000
Award Ceiling:
Award Floor:

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Small businesses
Additional Information on Eligibility: Other Eligible Applicants include the following: Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Institutions) are not eligible to apply. Non-domestic (non-U.S.) components of U.S. Organizations are not eligible to apply. Foreign components, as defined in the NIH Grants Policy Statement, may be allowed.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicits R43/R44 SBIR grant applications from small businesses to develop novel technologies that will enable new approaches to DNA and direct RNA sequencing. Applicants may propose to develop novel complete sequencing systems, investigate challenges underlying key novel system components, or propose improvements of at least an order of magnitude improvement to existing systems. Exploration of methods other than those currently in use is highly encouraged. High-risk/high-payoff applications are appropriate to achieve the goals of this FOA.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HG-15-033.html