Seek, Test, Treat and Retain For Youth and Young Adults Living with or at High Risk for Acquiring HIV (R01)

RFA-DA-16-010
Seek, Test, Treat and Retain For Youth and Young Adults Living with or at High Risk for Acquiring HIV (R01)
Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health

us-statistics-3

Section I. Funding Opportunity Description
Background

The “Seek, Test, Treat, and Retain” (STTR) approach to HIV prevention involves reaching out to high-risk, hard-to-reach groups who have not been recently tested for HIV (Seek), engaging them in HIV testing (Test), initiating, monitoring, and maintaining antiretroviral therapy (ART) for those testing HIV+ positive (Treat) and retaining patients in HIV and other relevant care (Retain) to impact HIV transmission on a population basis. The STTR paradigm has demonstrated efficacy in reducing HIV transmission at a population level among various key populations. Limited and inconsistent focus has been placed on the STTR paradigm among adolescents and young adults (defined in this RFA as 13-25 years of age) in the United States and internationally, particularly among substance using youth.  Youth generally are less likely to know their HIV status as compared to older populations. Consistent antiretroviral use and virologic suppression among adolescents and young adults are troublingly low as compared to adults in the US, with estimates that under 10% of all HIV+ youth are suppressed.  Similar findings have been observed in foreign settings.

Numerous individual and structural factors contribute to the challenges facing adolescent and young adult populations at risk for or living with HIV. If these factors are not addressed, the likelihood of STTR approaches making a difference in HIV incidence will be limited, at best. Younger populations at-risk for HIV may be members of groups that experience health care disparities, such as sexual minorities and, in the US, ethnic/racial minorities. High rates of substance use/abuse, particularly marijuana, alcohol, and stimulants, as well as are seen among youth in many locales and these are associated with risky sexual behavior (e.g., condomless sex) among both HIV- and HIV+ youth and young adults. Substance use prevention has demonstrated a  role in reducing HIV sexual risk and consequences such as sexual transmitted infections (STIs) is likely to serve as a facilitator of HIV treatment adherence. Youth may be more difficult to reach because adolescence and young adulthood are periods of transition, which may include repeated geographic moves, changes in educational or work status, and changing eligibility for entitlements and health insurance. HIV+ youth may transition from pediatric and adolescent health settings to adult health care settings with little systematic transfer of health records and clinical follow-up. Laws that govern the role of parents in the health care of youth and the autonomy of minors vary greatly within the US and across countries. These laws affect the ability of youth to seek HIV testing services, as well as services for substance use problems. Laws also may affect autonomy to participate in parts of STTR (e.g., initial screening and perhaps treatment of collateral, contributory problems such as STIs or substance abuse). Cultural norms may lead to parent or guardian involvement in health care decisions after youth reach majority in many places.  Therefore, involvement of parents and guardians needs to be a continuing consideration.

Because adolescents and young adults have not achieved full physical or cognitive maturity, linking and retaining HIV+ youth in care can be challenging. There is a dearth of HIV-specialty care geared toward adolescents and a lack of attention to their developmental needs. Where adolescent services exist there often is an absence of seamless transition to adult-based health care when they become adults. Beyond reproductive health care for young women, there is no systematic focus for routine and preventive health care among youth (regardless of HIV status) and young people realistically may perceive that they are at low risk for many of the most common chronic conditions like HIV, and may only engage health care for accidents or obvious clinical symptoms.

There are a small number of HIV or substance use providers who target youth, whereas most services are designed for adults. Simply promoting utilization of these adult-focused services by youth may fail to surmount the structural and other factors that govern the health behavior of younger people. Because youth may access HIV testing at community sites outside of the health care system, linkage between organizations that target and service youth (e.g., non-governmental organizations, social service, juvenile justice) and health care systems is important, as well as coordination of collateral services, as needed, for comorbid conditions that interfere with treatment adherence or virologic response (e.g., substance use disorders, STIs).

Research Objectives

The purpose of this FOA is to examine delivery models of HIV-focused services (testing, linkage, engagement and retention in care) for high risk or already HIV+ infected youth and young adults, with the ultimate goal of preventing HIV acquisition or onward transmission. Applications should incorporate substance use into study aims; objectives should address access to substance use prevention, screening, and/or treatment, as appropriate. Applications examining interventions that focus only on individual-level behavior and outcomes will be considered non-responsive, given the systemic and structural determinants of serostatus screening, treatment retention and viral suppression, which are the most striking areas of deficit among youth in the HIV continuum of care. The developmental, structural, and systemic factors related to serving youth need to be clearly incorporated into study aims, rather than simply refocusing existing interventions to younger people. Projects do not need to address the complete STTR continuum but should clearly address areas of particularly significant deficits for serving youth. Merely providing referrals to specialty care settings – without structural supports to ensure receipt of the referred service and ongoing coordination of care among service providers – is insufficient to be responsive to this FOA. Applications should demonstrate empirically that the target population is at high risk for HIV acquisition or has elevated rates of current HIV infection, and is therefore of high priority for testing, screening, or linkage. Integration of collateral services (e.g., substance use or STI treatment; prevention or early intervention for substance use) needs to be clearly integrated into the STTR framework, but should not be the primary focus of the study outcomes.

Because youth are likely to be early in their sexual development and can be exposed to the HIV virus over the course of years of subsequent sexual activity, it is imperative that projects that include screening also provide effective prevention modalities to HIV-negative youth. The purpose of this FOA is not to develop new prevention modalities, but projects are expected to incorporate, implement, and evaluate efficacious interventions with consideration to biologic as well as behavioral approaches. Projects should provide an evidence-based rationale for how their approach will lead to the expected outcomes, utilizing behavioral, social, organizational systems or other applicable theory.

Projects need not encompass the full age range covered by this FOA (ages 13-25) but a rationale should be provided for the age range that is chosen, and the components of the proposed project should be developmentally appropriate to that age group and their HIV and substance use epidemiology. Applicable laws regarding the participation of minors in research and clinical care vary widely, however, this should not preclude consideration of younger age groups, nor should it exclude consideration of parent or guardian roles among youth of any age.

Projects should take into account NIH HIV/AIDS research priorities http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-15-137.html

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-DA-16-010
Funding Opportunity Title: Seek, Test, Treat and Retain For Youth and Young Adults Living with or at High Risk for Acquiring HIV (R01)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Education
Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.279 — Drug Abuse and Addiction Research Programs
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Dec 8, 2015
Creation Date: Dec 8, 2015
Original Closing Date for Applications: Mar 2, 2016  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Mar 2, 2016  
Archive Date: Apr 2, 2016
Estimated Total Program Funding: $3,000,000
Award Ceiling:
Award Floor:

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Independent school districts
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
State governments
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Private institutions of higher education
Special district governments
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Small businesses
County governments
City or township governments
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Additional Information on Eligibility: Other Eligible Applicants include the following: Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions; Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISISs); Eligible Agencies of the Federal Government; Faith-based or Community-based Organizations; Hispanic-serving Institutions; Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Other than Federally Recognized); Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Organizations); Regional Organizations; Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) ; U.S. Territory or Possession.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to examine seek, test, treat and retain approaches among youth and young adults (ages 13-25) who are at high risk for HIV acquisition or have already acquired HIV. Applications should incorporate substance use into study aims; objectives should address substance use prevention, screening, and/or treatment in ways that facilitate use of HIV prevention and treatment services. Youth are the target of this RFA because they demonstrate lower levels of screening and engagement across the HIV continuum of care and HIV+ youth are less likely to achieve viral suppression than those at older ages. These disparities are evident in US and foreign populations. The developmental, structural, and systemic factors related to serving youth need to be clearly incorporated into study aims, rather than simple incremental refocusing of existing interventions to younger people. Both domestic and international projects will be supported
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-16-010.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

NIH OER Webmaster FBOWebmaster@OD.NIH.GOV
If you have any problems linking to this funding announcement, please contact the NIH OER Webmaster

PEPFAR Small Grants Program 2015-2016, U.S. Embassy Maseru [Communities Affected by AIDS/HIV]

DOS-MSU-PFSGP-FY16
PEPFAR Small Grants Program 2015-2016, U.S. Embassy Maseru
Department of State
U.S. Mission to Maseru-Lesotho

Everyone is Lesotho is either infected or affected by HIV/AIDS.

HL-Youth-AIDS-Day-Seotlong-Centre-2

Source: http://www.helplesotho.org/lesotho/hivaids-in-lesotho/

Criteria for Funding

Consideration will only be given to projects which:

  • Address the needs of OVC and/or support community-based HIV and AIDS palliative care and home health care
  • Have at least eight project members
  • Improve basic economic or social conditions at the local community or village level
  • Support high impact, quick implementation activities that benefit a substantial number of people within one year without requiring further assistance or funding
  • Are oriented toward communities, not individuals
  • Involve at least a 10% contribution of cash, labor, or materials by members of the local community
  • Are within the ability of the local community to operate and maintain
  • Are managed and run by local Basotho groups, e.g. community-based organizations, faith-based organizations and/or groups of people living with HIV or AIDS
  • Can be measured through tangible results and reports, e.g. number of people supported and/or trained
  • Are a direct response to the initiative and aspirations of the local community

Grant Conditions

PEPFAR Small Grants program funds can be used for:

  • Home-based caregiver kits and medical supplies
  • Training for caregivers and care providers
  • Equipment for OVC centers
  • Educational materials and training supplies
  • Equipment, materials and technical training for income-generation projects
  • Ongoing administrative or operating costs (but no more than 10% of total requested funds budget)
  • Structured and measurable prevention and awareness campaigns, workshops and outreach sessions

PEPFAR Small Grants program funds cannot be used for:

  • Remodeling or renovating an existing facility that is in disrepair as a result of neglect or lack of money
  • Projects managed by private businesses, private crèches or public schools
  • Food and food parcels
  • School uniforms, school fees or student bursaries
  • Salaries and/or personal expenses
  • Motorized vehicles or tractors
  • Pesticides, fungicides, and herbicides
  • Office equipment such as computers, fax machines, or photocopiers
  • Military activities (including those relating to police, prisons or other law enforcement activities)
  • Activities with unmitigated and negative environmental consequences, e.g. dams or forest roads 

Measurable Results Requirement

PEPFAR Small Grants program funds can only be used for projects which are able to measure and report on how they contribute to HIV/AIDS and OVC care.  Projects must be able to count or describe the following on a quarterly basis:

Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) Projects

  • Services provided (e.g. healthcare, shelter, child protection, HIV and AIDS prevention education)
  • Number of children served
  • Number of providers and/or caregivers trained

Community-based Palliative and Home Care Projects

  • Number of individuals provided with general HIV-related palliative and home care
  • Type of care provided (such as physical, spiritual, psychological, or social support)
  • Number of caregivers trained to provide general HIV-related palliative and home care

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: DOS-MSU-PFSGP-FY16
Funding Opportunity Title: PEPFAR Small Grants Program 2015-2016, U.S. Embassy Maseru
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Health
Category Explanation: Health, HIV/AIDS, Orphan and Vulnerable Children (OVC)
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 19.029 — The U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief Programs
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

Posted Date:Oct 22, 2015

Creation Date:Oct 22, 2015

Original Closing Date for Applications:Jan 31, 2016 

 Current Closing Date for Applications:Jan 31, 2016 

 Archive Date:Mar 1, 2016

Estimated Total Program Funding:$150,000

Award Ceiling:$25,000

Award Floor:$5,000
Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Additional Information on Eligibility: All applicants must be non-profit local community based organizations that address the needs of orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) and/or support community based HIV and AIDS care initiatives.

Additional Information

Agency Name: U.S. Mission to Maseru-Lesotho
Description: Funded by the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, PEPFAR. The PEPFAR Small Grants Program is for community initaited projects which aim to strengthen health services in communities affected by HIV and AIDS. The program supports projects that support and protect vulnerable children (OVC) and adolecents, and community based HIV and AIDS care initiatives. The funds can only be used for projects which are able to measure and report on how they contribute to HIV and AIDS, and OVC care. The U.S. Embassy Maseru will prioritize proposals that present creative, original and innovative ideas and that improve basic economi or social conditions at the local community or village level.
Link to Additional Information: http://maseru.usembassy.gov/pepfar-small-grants-program.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

Special Projects Office, U.S. Embassy Maseru +266 2231 2666
grantsmaseru@state.gov

Strengthening the Capacity of Local Indigenous Faith Based Partners in Zambia to Provide HIV and AIDS Prevention, Treatment and Care Services in a Comprehensive and Sustainable Manner under the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)

CDC-RFA-GH11-112005CONT16PEPFAR_logo500
Strengthening the Capacity of Local Indigenous Faith Based Partners in Zambia to Provide HIV and AIDS Prevention, Treatment and Care Services in a
Comprehensive and Sustainable Manner under the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)

Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: CDC-RFA-GH11-112005CONT16
Funding Opportunity Title: Strengthening the Capacity of Local Indigenous Faith Based Partners in Zambia to Provide HIV and AIDS Prevention, Treatment and Care Services in a Comprehensive and Sustainable Manner under the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)
Opportunity Category: Continuation
Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement
Category of Funding Activity: Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.067 — Global AIDS
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Sep 16, 2015
Creation Date: Sep 16, 2015
Original Closing Date for Applications: Oct 23, 2015  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Oct 23, 2015  
Archive Date: Nov 22, 2015
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $0
Award Floor: $0

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Additional Information on Eligibility: This award will be a continuation of funds intended only for grantees previously awarded under CDC-RFA-GH11-1120: Strengthening the Capacity of Local Indigenous Faith Based Partners in Zambia to Provide HIV and AIDS Prevention, Treatment and Care Services in a Comprehensive and Sustainable Manner under the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR).

Additional Information

Agency Name: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Description: Strengthening the Capacity of Local Indigenous Faith Based Partners in Zambia to Provide HIV and AIDS Prevention, Treatment and Care Services in a Comprehensive and Sustainable Manner under the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)
Link to Additional Information:  http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=279023
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

PGOTIMS Phone 770-488-2700
PGOTIMS

Continue reading

AIDS-Science Track Award for Research Transition (R03)

A group advocating AIDS research marches down Fifth Avenue during the 14th annual Lesbian and Gay Pride parade in New York, June 27, 1983. This year’s parade is dedicated to victims of the incurable disease AIDS which primarily afflicts homosexual men. (AP Photo/Mario Suriani)
A group advocating AIDS research marches down Fifth Avenue during the 14th annual Lesbian and Gay Pride parade in New York, June 27, 1983.  (AP Photo/Mario Suriani)

PA-15-290

AIDS-Science Track Award for Research Transition (R03)

Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health

Research Objectives

This FOA seeks to promote the entry of new investigators into research on drug abuse and HIV who will conduct studies on: the prevention of HIV acquisition and transmission; HIV treatment including toward a cure research; co-morbidities, co-infections, and complications; and behavioral and social science research to advance treatment and prevention, especially to address the Continuum of Care.

NIDA research on HIV/AIDS is broad-based and includes both domestic and international studies and ranges from basic research, including studies using animal models, in vitro, and ex vivo systems, to clinical research to implementation science research. A-START applications are welcome across the breadth of NIDA research.

Drug-using populations tend to be marginalized and difficult-to-reach, but achieving an AIDS-free generation will not be possible without understanding the issues facing these populations and developing and implementing effective interventions for them.  The drug-using populations that NIDA studies include both injection and non-injection drug users, youth, racial/ethnic/sexual minorities, and criminal justice populations.

Information about NIDA’s HIV/AIDS priority research areas is available at: http://www.nida.nih.gov/about/organization/arp/. Applications to A-START should address high priority HIV/AIDS research at the intersection of drug abuse and HIV research.

Investigators are encouraged, when appropriate, to utilize the Clinical Trials Network (CTN) (http://www.drugabuse.gov/CTN/Index.htm) infrastructure as a platform for their studies.

Special Considerations

HIV/AIDS Counseling and Testing Policy for the National Institute on Drug Abuse:  In light of recent significant advances in rapid testing for HIV and in effective treatments for HIV, NIDA has revised its 2001 policy on HIV counseling and testing.  NIDA-funded researchers are strongly encouraged to provide and/or refer research subjects to HIV risk reduction education and education about the benefits of HIV treatment, counseling and testing, referral to treatment, and other appropriate interventions to prevent acquisition and transmission of HIV.  This policy applies to all NIDA funded research conducted domestically or internationally.  For more information see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-DA-07-013.html.

National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse Recommended Guidelines for the Administration of Drugs to Human Subjects:  The National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse (NACDA) recognizes the importance of research involving the administration of drugs with abuse potential, and dependence or addiction liability, to human subjects.   Potential applicants are encouraged to obtain and review these recommendations of Council before submitting an application that will administer compounds to human subjects.  The guidelines are available on NIDA’s Web site at http://www.nida.nih.gov/about/organization/nacda/CouncilStatement.html.

Points to Consider Regarding Tobacco Industry Funding of NIDA Applicants: The National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse (NACDA) encourages NIDA and its grantees to consider the points it has set forth with regard to existing or prospective sponsored research agreements with tobacco companies or their related entities and the impact of acceptance of tobacco industry funding on NIDA’s credibility and reputation within the scientific community.  Please see (http://ww2.drugabuse.gov/about/organization/nacda/points-to-consider.html) for details.

Data Harmonization for Substance Abuse and Addiction via the PhenX Toolkit:  NIDA strongly encourages investigators involved in human-subjects studies to employ a common set of tools and resources that will promote the collection of comparable data across studies and to do so by incorporating the measures from the Core and Specialty collections, which are available in the Substance Abuse and Addiction Collection of the PhenX Toolkit (www.phenxtoolkit.org).  Please see NOT-DA-12-008 (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-DA-12-008.html) for further details.

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: PA-15-290
Funding Opportunity Title: AIDS-Science Track Award for Research Transition (R03)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Education
Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.279 — Drug Abuse and Addiction Research Programs
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Sep 9, 2015
Creation Date: Sep 9, 2015
Original Closing Date for Applications: Sep 7, 2018  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Sep 7, 2018  
Archive Date: Oct 8, 2018
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $100,000
Award Floor:

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Special district governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Independent school districts
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher education
County governments
State governments
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
City or township governments
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Small businesses
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Additional Information on Eligibility: Other Eligible Applicants include the following: Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions; Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISISs); Eligible Agencies of the Federal Government; Faith-based or Community-based Organizations; Hispanic-serving Institutions; Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Other than Federally Recognized); Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Organizations); Regional Organizations; Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) ; U.S. Territory or Possession.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) seeks to facilitate the entry of both newly independent and early career investigators to the area of drug abuse research on HIV/AIDS. This FOA, AIDS-Science Track Award for Research Transition (A-START), encourages Small Research Grant (R03) applications to support research projects on drug abuse and HIV/AIDS that can be carried out in a short period of time with limited resources. Applications under this FOA are welcomed from all areas of HIV/AIDS research that NIDA supports.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-15-290.html

Minority HIV/AIDS Research Initiative (MARI) to Build HIV Prevention, Treatment and Research Capacity in Disproportionately Affected Black and Hispanic Communities and Among Historically Underrepresented Researchers

RFA-PS-16-001

Minority HIV/AIDS Research Initiative (MARI) to Build HIV Prevention, Treatment and Research Capacity in Disproportionately Affected Black and Hispanic Communities and Among Historically Underrepresented Researchers

Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-PS-16-001
Funding Opportunity Title: Minority HIV/AIDS Research Initiative (MARI) to Build HIV Prevention, Treatment and Research Capacity in
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement
Category of Funding Activity: Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards: 8
CFDA Number(s): 93.941 — HIV Demonstration, Research, Public and Professional Education Projects
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

Posted Date:Aug 7, 2015

Creation Date:Aug 7, 2015

Original Closing Date for Applications:Oct 14, 2015  

Current Closing Date for Applications:Oct 14, 2015 

 Archive Date:Nov 13, 2015

Estimated Total Program Funding:$9,600,000

Award Ceiling:$300,000

Award Floor:$0

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Additional Information on Eligibility: Eligibility Category: State governments County governments City or township governments Special district governments Independent school districts Public and State controlled institutions of higher education Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized) Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments) Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education Private institutions of higher education For profit organizations other than small businesses Small businesses Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification) The following types of Higher Education Institutions are always encouraged to apply for CDC support as Public or Private Institutions of Higher Education: Hispanic-serving Institutions Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions Nonprofits Other Than Institutions of Higher Education: Nonprofits (Other than Institutions of Higher Education) Governments: Eligible Agencies of the Federal Government U.S. Territory or Possession Other:Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments) Faith-based or Community-based Organizations Regional Organizations Bona Fide Agents: a Bona Fide Agent is an agency/organization identified by the state as eligible to submit an application under the state eligibility in lieu of a state application. If applying as a bona fide agent of a state or local government, a legal, binding agreement from the state or local government as documentation of the status is required. Attach with “Other Attachment Forms” when submitting via http://www.grants.gov. Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDCs): FFRDCs are operated, managed, and/or administered by a university or consortium of universities, other not-for-profit or nonprofit organization, or an industrial firm, as an autonomous organization or as an identifiable separate operating unit of a parent organization. A FFRDC meets some special long-term research or development need which cannot be met as effectively by an agency’s existing in-house or contractor resources. FFRDC’s enable agencies to use private sector resources to accomplish tasks that are integral to the mission and operation of the sponsoring agency. For more information on FFRDCs, go to http:// ecfr.gpoaccess.gov /cgi/t/text/ text-idx?c=ecfr& sid=512ff78311f427c00454772dcf21523a&rgn=div8 &view=text&node=48:1.0.1.6.34.0.1.18& idno=48 2. Foreign Organizations Foreign Organizations are not eligible to apply. Foreign components of U.S. Organizations are not eligible to apply. For this announcement, applicants may not include collaborators or consultants from foreign institutions. All applicable federal laws and policies apply. 3. Special Eligibility Requirements Foreign institutions and components of foreign institutions are not eligible to apply.