AFAR Invites Applications for Glenn/AFAR Postdoctoral Fellowship Program for Translational Research

AFAR Invites Applications for Glenn/AFAR Postdoctoral Fellowship Program for Translational Research

translational
SOURCE: Glenn Foundation for Medical Research, American Federation for Aging Research (AFAR)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Letter of Intent must be received no later than 3/3/16. Upon review, selected applicants will be invited to submit a full proposal by mid-June, 2016.
$ AVAILABLE: The foundation expects to make 10 grants ranging between $49,000 and $60,000, based on years of relevant experience. Recipients are expected to attend the AFAR Grantee Conference, and funds will be withheld from the grant for this purpose.
ELIGIBILITY: Postdoctoral fellows at all levels of training are eligible to apply as long as they hold an M.D. and/or Ph.D. degree (or equivalent) at the start date of the award period (October 1, 2016). The proposed research may be conducted at any type of nonprofit setting in the United States. Individuals who are employees in the NIH Intramural program are not eligible to apply. In addition, fellows may not be the recipient of any concurrent foundation, nonprofit, or government funding.
PURPOSE: The Glenn Foundation for Medical Research, in partnership with the American Federation for Aging Research, established the Glenn/AFAR Postdoctoral Fellowship Program for Translational Research on Aging to encourage and further the careers of postdoctoral fellows who are uniquely capable of translating advances in basic research from the laboratory to the clinic. The award is intended to provide significant research and training support to permit fellows to become established in the field of aging.
Projects concerned with understanding the basic mechanisms of aging that have direct relevance to human aging will be considered if they show the potential to lead to clinically relevant strategies that address human aging and health span. Projects investigating age-related diseases are also supported if approached from the point of view of how basic aging processes may lead to these outcomes. In addition, projects concerning mechanisms underlying common geriatric functional disorders such as frailty will also be considered. Priority will be given to studies using human subjects, human cells and tissues, and/or mice or other mammals.
CONTACT: Please see URL for contact information. For more information see http://www.afar.org/research/funding/glenn-postdoc/
From The Foundation Center’s Philanthropy News Digest Web site, accessed 1/6/16icon
Subject(s) aged/seniors, medical research

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Improving Diabetes Management in Children with Type 1 Diabetes (DP3)

Improving Diabetes Management in Children with Type 1 Diabetes (DP3): RFA-DK-16-003

juvenile diabetes

Goals

The goal of this initiative is to support research to develop, refine, and pilot test innovative strategies to improve diabetes management and quality of life in families with children with type 1 diabetes. Studies in response to this funding opportunity can focus on young children (under 5 years old) and/or school-aged children (ages 5-9 years old).  At the end of the funding period, there should be well-developed and well-characterized intervention/s that have been demonstrated to be safe, feasible to implement, effective, acceptable in the target population, and ready to be tested in a larger efficacy trial. T

The focus of research submitted to this FOA should be on improving clinical outcomes. Therefore, the primary outcome should be a clinical measure of improved diabetes management (e.g., HbA1c, hypoglycemia, DKA). Secondary outcomes can include other physiologic measures, parent and child coping and should include measurement of behavior change targeted in the intervention.

Pilot or preliminary data are not required. However, there should be a strong justification that the proposed approach has promise for improving diabetes management in children. For example, the approach has been shown to be effective with other patient populations or diseases or there is a reasonable foundation of basic behavioral or social science to suggest that the target of intervention influences relevant behavior or coping.

This FOA focuses on developing interventions to improve diabetes management. Research might address the following issues related to diabetes management:

Interventions to help families improve diabetes management such as approaches focused on the targets below or some combination:

  • Families (the parents or other caregivers) to address issues such as diabetes related stress/distress, family coping/communication, low health literacy/numeracy, or over/under prediction of risks;
  • The healthcare team including collaborative communication between the family and the health care team and family-centered diabetes management goal setting and assessment;
  • The health care system (practice level changes, health information technology tools); or
  • Other resources or tools to support family coping and improve diabetes self-management.

Interventions to improve the use of new or existing technologies, including insulin pumps, blood glucose monitors, and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems to:

  • Better address nocturnal hypoglycemia such as with a CGM that may be integrated in a low glucose suspend or closed loop system; or
  • Address barriers to use of the technology and identify and test approaches that facilitate more effective and sustained use.

Exchange of ideas and collaboration between funded investigators will be encouraged though yearly investigator meetings.

Research in response to this initiative should be for human studies only.

SOURCE: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Letter of Intent: 5/22/16. Application: 6/22/16 by 5 pm local time of applicant organization.

$ AVAILABLE: NIDDK intends to commit up to $6 million in FY 2017 to fund up to three awards.

ELIGIBILITY: * Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education.
* Hispanic-serving institutions.
* Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).
* Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs).
* Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions.
* Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs).
* Nonprofits with or without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education).
* Small businesses.
* For-profit organizations (other than small businesses).
* State governments.
* County governments.
* City or township governments.
* Special district governments.
* Indian/Native American tribal governments (federally recognized and other than federally recognized).
* Eligible agencies of the federal government.
* U.S. territories or possessions.
* Independent school districts.
* Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities.
* Native American tribal organizations (other than federally recognized tribal governments).
* Faith-based or community-based organizations.
* Regional organizations.

PURPOSE: The goal of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support research to develop, refine, and pilot test innovative strategies to improve management of type 1 diabetes in young children (under 5 years old) and/or school-aged children (ages 5-9 years old).
CFDA: 93.847

CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts. For more information see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-16-003.html
From NIH Web site, accessed 1/6/16icon
Subject(s) children’s health, diabetes, medical research

 

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Improving Diabetes Management in Pre-teens, Adolescents and/or Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes (DP3): RFA-DK-16-001
SOURCE: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Letter of Intent: 5/22/16. Application: 6/22/16 by 5 pm local time of applicant organization.
$ AVAILABLE: NIDDK intends to commit up to $6 million in FY 2017 to fund up to three awards.
ELIGIBILITY: * Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education.
* Hispanic-serving institutions.
* Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).
* Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs).
* Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions.
* Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs).
* Nonprofits with or without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education).
* Small businesses.
* For-profit organizations (other than small businesses).
* State governments.
* County governments.
* City or township governments.
* Special district governments.
* Indian/Native American tribal governments (federally recognized and other than federally recognized).
* Eligible agencies of the federal government.
* U.S. territories or possessions.
* Independent school districts.
* Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities.
* Native American tribal organizations (other than federally recognized tribal governments).
* Faith-based or community-based organizations.
* Regional organizations.
PURPOSE: The goal of this FOA is to encourage applications from institutions/organizations proposing to develop, refine, and pilot test innovative strategies to improve diabetes management in pre-teens (ages 10-12), adolescents (ages 13-18) and/or young adults (ages 19-30) with type 1 diabetes.
CFDA: 93.847
CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts. For more information see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-16-001.html
From NIH Web site, accessed 1/6/16icon
Subject(s) diabetes, medical research

Minerva Research Initiative-Department of Defense

WHS-AD-FOA-16-01
Minerva Research Initiative
Department of Defensexl_deptofdefenselogo

Multi-Year University-Led Projects

The Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) seeks proposals from university researchers and university-led teams for the Minerva Research Initiative, a university-led defense social science program seeking fundamental understanding of the social and cultural forces shaping U.S. strategic interests globally. [see the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) at grants.gov]

Submissions should propose basic research relevant to the five core topic areas. The more detailed descriptions of each (found in the released FOA) are intended to provide the proposer a frame of reference though not to be restrictive. Topics are not mutually exclusive and proposals may consider issues relating to questions, scope, or regions beyond those listed.

The 2016 solicitation once again considers proposals ranging from single-investigator awards to larger, multidisciplinary and multi-institution teams. This competition is open to institutions of higher education (universities), including DoD institutions of higher education and non-U.S. universities. Non-profit institutions and commercial entities are again eligible to compete as collaborators on university-led proposals.

More details are posted on our FAQ page. [Note: An FOA is functionally the same as the old Broad Agency Announcements (BAA).]

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: WHS-AD-FOA-16-01
Funding Opportunity Title: Minerva Research Initiative
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Science and Technology and other Research and Development
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards: 12
CFDA Number(s): 12.630 — Basic, Applied, and Advanced Research in Science and Engineering
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Jan 12, 2016
Creation Date: Jan 12, 2016
Original Closing Date for Applications: Jun 17, 2016  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Jun 17, 2016  
Archive Date: Jul 17, 2016
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $5,000,000
Award Floor: $150,000

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Private institutions of higher education
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Additional Information on Eligibility:

Additional Information

Agency Name: Department of Defense
Description: Just as the Cold War gave rise to new ideas and fields of study such as game theory and Kremlinology, the challenges facing the world today call for a broader conception and application of national power that goes beyond military capability. The Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) is interested in receiving proposals for the Minerva Research Initiative (http://minerva.dtic.mil), a university-led defense social science program seeking fundamental understanding of the social and cultural forces shaping U.S. strategic interests globally. The Minerva Research Initiative (Minerva) emphasizes questions of strategic importance to U.S. national security policy. It seeks to increase the Department’s intellectual capital in the social sciences and improve its ability to address future challenges and build bridges between the Department and the social science community. Minerva brings together universities and other research institutions around the world and supports multidisciplinary and cross-institutional projects addressing specific topic areas determined by the Department of Defense. The Minerva program aims to promote research in specific areas of social science and to promote a candid and constructive relationship between DoD and the social science academic community. The Minerva Research Initiative competition is for research related to the five (5) topics and associated subtopics listed below. Innovative white papers and proposals related to these research topics are highly encouraged. Detailed descriptions of the topics can be found in Section IX, “Specific Minerva Research Initiative Topics.” I. Identity, Influence, and Mobilization Culture, identity, and security Influence and mobilization for change II. Contributors to Societal Resilience and Change Governance and rule of law Migration and urbanization Populations and demographics Environment and natural resources Economics III. Power and Deterrence Global order Power projection and diffusion Beyond conventional deterrence Area studies IV. Analytical methods and metrics for security research V. Innovations in National Security, Conflict, and Cooperation Proposals will be considered both for single-investigator awards as well as larger teams. A team of university investigators may be warranted because the necessary expertise in addressing the multiple facets of the topics may reside in different universities, or in different departments of the same university. The research questions addressed should extend across a fairly broad range of linked issues where there is clear potential synergy among the contributions of the distinct disciplines represented on the team. Team proposals must name one Principal Investigator as the responsible technical point of contact. Similarly, one institution will be the primary recipient for the purpose of award execution. The relationship among participating institutions and their respective roles, as well as the apportionment of funds including sub-awards, if any, must be described in both the proposal text and the budget. The Minerva Research Initiative is a multi-service effort. Ultimately, however, funding decisions will be made by OSD personnel, with technical inputs from the Services.
Link to Additional Information: DoD Minerva Program website
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

Angela Hughes Contracting Officer Phone 703-545-8995
work

Education and Health: New Frontiers (R01)

PAR-16-080
Education and Health: New Frontiers (R01)
Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health

NIH

 

Research Objectives

For this FOA, education refers to the comprehensive formal instruction that spans the human experience, from early childhood programs to pre-school, elementary and secondary schooling, college and adult learning programs. It includes the social and behavioral processes that are combined with formal instruction in educational environments. A better scientific understanding of the mechanisms linking education and health could lead to additional and improved prevention and therapeutic intervention strategies for important health problems. NOTE: This FOA is not directed at studies which limit their focus to the impact of specific health education courses or programs on health behaviors; rather, the focus is on the impact of more general education experiences.

In order to better understand these pathways, it will be necessary to explore what components or dimensions of education are important to health. The association or pathway between formal education and important health behaviors or diseases may not be causal. Instead it may reflect the influence of confounding or co-existing determinants or bi-directionality. Appropriate research topics for this FOA may involve pilot studies, new analyses of existing data, longitudinal studies, or a balance of approaches tailored for the study hypotheses. It is strongly encouraged that an application involve new teams of multidisciplinary researchers with expertise in both health and education domains.

Research Perspectives and Themes

To achieve the goal of a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms linking education and health outcomes, this FOA encourages the exploration of research perspectives and themes described below. The NIH believes these approaches may move current research efforts to the next level of accomplishment. Applicants are not required to incorporate all of the themes below into their research applications; however, applicants should explicitly address at least one.

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-16-080
Funding Opportunity Title: Education and Health: New Frontiers (R01)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Education
Health
Income Security and Social Services
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.279 — Drug Abuse and Addiction Research Programs
93.399 — Cancer Control
93.865 — Child Health and Human Development Extramural Research
93.866 — Aging Research
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Jan 12, 2016
Creation Date: Jan 12, 2016
Original Closing Date for Applications: Jan 7, 2019  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Jan 7, 2019  
Archive Date: Feb 7, 2019
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling:
Award Floor:

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Private institutions of higher education
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
State governments
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
County governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Additional Information on Eligibility: See full announcement for complete details.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: The goal of this funding opportunity announcement is to support research that will further elucidate the pathways involved in the relationship between education and health outcomes and in doing so to carefully identify the specific aspects and qualities of education that are responsible for this relationship and what the mediating factors are that affect the nature of the causal relationship.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-16-080.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

eRA Commons Help Desk Monday to Friday 7 am to 8 pm ET Phone 1-866-504-9552
Grants Info

Other Grant Opportunities in this area:

Education and Health: New Frontiers (R03)

Education and Health: New Frontiers (R21)

NIDCD National Human Ear Tissue Laboratory Resource for Hearing and Balance Research (U24)

RFA-DC-17-001
NIDCD National Human Ear Tissue Laboratory Resource for Hearing and Balance Research (U24)
Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health

Tom Cervantes
In this Monday, July 2, 2012 photo Tom Cervantes, of Boston, a research engineer at the Laboratory for Tissue Engineering and Organ Fabrication at Massachusetts General Hospital, displays a titanium frame designed for the reconstruction of a human ear, left, and a three dimensional plastic ear model, right, at the lab, in Boston. Scientists are growing ears, bone and skin in the lab, and doctors are planning more face transplants and other extreme plastic surgeries. Around the country, the most advanced medical tools that exist are now being deployed to help America’s newest veterans and wounded troops. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Objectives

Establishing a national laboratory resource for auditory and vestibular researchers will benefit all those who use human inner and middle ear tissues for a range of basic and clinical studies.  The Laboratory will develop and provide technical services for procuring, preparing, sectioning and distributing high-quality human tissues; develop and disseminate techniques for improved tissue processing; develop imaging methods for human middle and inner ear structures, including cellular and membranous components; and provide opportunities for technical instruction in the special skills needed to prepare ear and use tissues from post-mortem human temporal bone donations.  A cooperative agreement will coordinate interactions with the basic and clinical research community and maximize impact while avoiding duplicative efforts.  This resource will benefit a broad spectrum of research projects by providing critical technological improvements to analyze human ear tissues, with an impact on translational work and eventually the clinic, for the NIDCD mission to help prevent, detect, diagnose, and treat deafness and other communication disorders.

Background and Need

Structural details of the inner ear sensory organs for hearing and balance are difficult to study in humans because these soft tissues are encased in the dense temporal bone of the skull. The cochlea and the vestibular system are not readily accessible for biopsy or by non-invasive techniques that preserve function in living subjects. The value of otopathology in understanding ear diseases and disorders is without question, yet studies of human auditory and vestibular tissues are limited by the uneven quality of preservation and preparation of donated post-mortem specimens. These restrictions seriously limit progress in understanding pathology of the organs of hearing and balance in humans. Many investigators have relied instead on animal studies for experiments, but the necessary human relevance of such studies has not been forthcoming, and a few reported human results are significantly different from those in animals.  The critical need to relate findings from animal models to human ear disorders has been emphasized repeatedly in various research meetings as well as the recent NIDCD Strategic Plan. The 2015 NIDCD Research Workshop: “Synaptopathy and Noise-Induced Hearing Loss: Animal Studies and Implications for Human Hearing” emphasized the need for human data to reveal structural correlates of genetic and physiological disorders of the human ear as well as to visualize the consequences of therapeutic treatments including drugs and devices. However, technological challenges in acquisition, processing, and visualization of human ear tissues are not trivial, and very few temporal bone labs still prepare new human material. The purpose of this U24 is to create a single national laboratory to serve the auditory and vestibular basic and clinical research communities more broadly, by improving the quantity, quality and availability of human specimens, by developing and sharing advances in methods and techniques for human ear tissue processing, by developing technologies for non-invasive imaging, and by providing technical instruction, all to enhance opportunities for needed research on human ear tissues.

NIDCD continues to support the NIDCD National Temporal Bone, Hearing and Balance Pathology Resource Registry (‘the Registry’) as a separate U24 award. The Registry is an information center that coordinates and archives data about recruited temporal bone donors and location of specimens nationwide, and maintains a network of contacts for timely procurement of tissue. The Registry serves as a database, which does not obtain or process specimens or do research. Creating a complementary national research resource to acquire and improve processing of human middle and inner ear tissues is a related but distinct activity designed to provide technological improvements for new research contributions from a wide range of investigators.

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-DC-17-001
Funding Opportunity Title: NIDCD National Human Ear Tissue Laboratory Resource for Hearing and Balance Research (U24)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement
Category of Funding Activity: Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards: 1
CFDA Number(s): 93.173 — Research Related to Deafness and Communication Disorders
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Jan 13, 2016
Creation Date: Jan 13, 2016
Original Closing Date for Applications: Mar 31, 2016  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Mar 31, 2016  
Archive Date: May 1, 2016
Estimated Total Program Funding: $750,000
Award Ceiling: $475,000
Award Floor:

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Special district governments
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
State governments
County governments
City or township governments
Private institutions of higher education
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Additional Information on Eligibility: See full announcement for complete details.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: This FOA will establish a laboratory as a national technological resource for auditory and vestibular researchers who use human inner and middle ear tissues for a range of basic and clinical studies. The Laboratory will develop and provide technical services for procuring, preparing, sectioning and distributing high-quality human ear tissues; develop and disseminate techniques for improved tissue preservation and for imaging human middle and inner ear structures, including cellular and membranous components; and provide opportunities for technical instruction in the special skills needed to prepare ear and use tissues from post-mortem human temporal bones.A cooperative agreement will coordinate interactions with the research community to maximize impact and novelty while avoiding duplicative efforts.This resource will benefit a broad spectrum of research projects, including clinical and translational, by providing a critical link towards the translation of animal studies to the human ear and eventually the clinic, for the NIDCD mission to help prevent, detect, diagnose, and treat deafness and other communication disorders.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DC-17-001.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

eRA Service Desk Monday to Friday 7 am to 8 pm ET http://grants.nih.gov/support/ Phone 1-866-504-9552
Grants Info

Genome Sequencing Center for the Gabriella Miller Kids First Pediatric Research Program (U24)

RFA-RM-16-001
Genome Sequencing Center for the Gabriella Miller Kids First Pediatric Research Program (U24)
Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health

Gabriella-Miller21

Introduction

In response to The Gabriella Miller Kids First Act (https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/113/hr2019/text), NIH, through the Common Fund, has established the Gabriella Miller Kids First Pediatric Research Program (Kids First Program).  This program is intended to support a ten-year effort to develop an integrated Gabriela Miller Kids First Pediatric Data Resource (Kids First Data Resource) populated by genomic and phenotypic data that will be of high value for the pediatric research community.  This resource will allow data mining across diverse conditions to uncover shared developmental pathways.  The overall goal is to help researchers understand the underlying mechanisms of disease, leading to more refined diagnostic capabilities and ultimately more targeted therapies or interventions.

As the first step toward building the Kids First Data Resource, the Kids First Program published the Funding Opportunity Announcement, PAR-15-259, “Discovery of the Genetic Basis of Structural Birth Defects and of Childhood Cancers: Gabriella Miller Kids First Pediatric Research Program (X01)”, to solicit project/sample proposals to use whole genome sequencing to investigate the genetics of structural birth defects and the genetic contributions to childhood cancers.  Future calls will be published to continue the solicitation of similar types of projects and samples, pending availability of funds.

This FOA invites applications for sequencing center(s) that will produce whole genome sequence and variant data from the solicited samples (X01 samples) to contribute to the Kids First Data Resource.  It is funded through the NIH Common Fund, which supports cross-cutting programs that are expected to have exceptionally high impact. All Common Fund initiatives invite investigators to develop bold, innovative, and often risky approaches to address problems that may seem intractable or to seize new opportunities that offer the potential for rapid progress.

Goals

The goals of this FOA are as follows:

  • Generation of whole genome sequence data and variant data from cohorts for structural birth defects and childhood cancers that the Kids First Program will provide.
  • Submission of sequence and variant data to the controlled public database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP), and databases that may be designated by the Kids First Program, and providing the same data to the project/sample Program Directors/Principal Investigators (PDs/PIs) (X01 PDs/PIs).
  • Coordination with X01PDs/PIs who will submit the phenotypic data of the sequenced samples to the same databases.

The FOA expects high quality sequence and variant data to be generated from the largest number of cases and samples possible with available funds.  It is anticipated that costs will decrease over the course of the award while data quality is maintained or improved, so the number of cases that can be sequenced and analyzed per dollar spent is expected to increase.

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-RM-16-001
Funding Opportunity Title: Genome Sequencing Center for the Gabriella Miller Kids First Pediatric Research Program (U24)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement
Category of Funding Activity: Health
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.310 — Trans-NIH Research Support
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Jan 13, 2016
Creation Date: Jan 13, 2016
Original Closing Date for Applications: Mar 31, 2016  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Mar 31, 2016  
Archive Date: May 1, 2016
Estimated Total Program Funding: $12,600,000
Award Ceiling: $12,600,000
Award Floor:

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
City or township governments
County governments
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Private institutions of higher education
State governments
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Special district governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Additional Information on Eligibility: See full announcement for complete details.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to establish one or two centers that can rapidly generate high quality whole genome sequence and variant data from a large number of human specimens representing two types of pediatric conditions – structural birth defects and childhood cancers. The generated data will become a part of a data resource under The Gabriella Miller Kids First Pediatric Research Program, which will allow researchers to investigate the genetic etiology of structural birth defects, and to further elucidate the genetic contribution to childhood cancers.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-16-001.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

eRA Service Desk Monday to Friday 7 am to 8 pm ET http://grants.nih.gov/support/ Phone 1-866-504-9552
Grants Info

NIH Blueprint Training in Computational Neuroscience: From Biology to Model and Back Again (T90/R90)

RFA-DA-16-009
NIH Blueprint Training in Computational Neuroscience: From Biology to Model and Back Again (T90/R90)
Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health

comp neuro.png

Purpose and Background Information The overall goal of the NIH Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) program is to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists is available in appropriate scientific disciplines to address the Nation’s biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs.  In order to accomplish this goal, NRSA training programs are designed to train individuals to conduct research and to prepare for research careers. The NIH Research Education Program (R90) supports research educational activities that complement other formal training programs in the mission areas of the NIH Institutes and Centers.

Institutional training programs allow the Training Program Director/Principal Investigator (Training PD/PI) to select the trainees and develop a program of coursework, research experiences, and technical and/or professional skills development appropriate for the selected trainees. Each program should provide high-quality research training and offer opportunities in addition to conducting mentored research. The grant offsets the cost of stipends, tuition and fees, and training related expenses, including health insurance, for the appointed trainees in accordance with the approved NIH support levels.

Blueprint Training in Computational Neuroscience

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Blueprint for Neuroscience Research is a collaborative and coordinated effort across 13 Institutes and Centers that support research, research education, and research training with the goal of accelerating the pace of discovery in neuroscience research. By pooling resources and expertise, the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research can take advantage of economies of scale, confront challenges too large for any specific Institute or Center, and develop research tools and infrastructure that will serve the entire neuroscience community.

An exciting and difficult challenge in neuroscience is to understand how complex biological systems work, and particularly to understand the computational principles and mechanisms underlying the function of the nervous system in both normal and diseased states. Another challenge lies in interpreting the massive amount and extremely complex experimental data obtained by today’s advanced neuroscience research, which traditional analytical approaches are not sophisticated enough to handle. Computational neuroscience provides a theoretical foundation and set of technological approaches to meet these challenges and offers significant opportunities to investigate and integrate information about nervous system function across a range of scales: parts of cells, networks, whole brain function, and behavior. Two major obstacles have been identified to the training of computational neuroscientists. The first impediment is that individuals trained in the biological and behavioral sciences often do not have adequate background in the quantitative sciences. This education needs to begin as early as possible, ideally at the undergraduate level, and continue through graduate and postdoctoral levels to ensure a good foundation in quantitative science and the ability to adopt new computational theory and methodology as they emerge. Second, students with undergraduate degrees in the quantitative sciences often have little exposure to the exciting questions and experimental methods in the neurosciences to which their training would be highly relevant. A research education and research training program that begins early and exposes students to a wide range of neuroscience questions, methods, and experimental systems would help to overcome this second obstacle.

General Information

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-DA-16-009
Funding Opportunity Title: NIH Blueprint Training in Computational Neuroscience: From Biology to Model and Back Again (T90/R90)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Education
Environment
Health
Income Security and Social Services
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 93.113 — Environmental Health
93.121 — Oral Diseases and Disorders Research
93.213 — Research and Training in Complementary and Integrative Health
93.242 — Mental Health Research Grants
93.273 — Alcohol Research Programs
93.279 — Drug Abuse and Addiction Research Programs
93.286 — Discovery and Applied Research for Technological Innovations to Improve Human Health
93.361 — Nursing Research
93.853 — Extramural Research Programs in the Neurosciences and Neurological Disorders
93.865 — Child Health and Human Development Extramural Research
93.866 — Aging Research
93.867 — Vision Research
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
Posted Date: Jan 13, 2016
Creation Date: Jan 13, 2016
Original Closing Date for Applications: Mar 18, 2016  
Current Closing Date for Applications: Mar 18, 2016  
Archive Date: Apr 18, 2016
Estimated Total Program Funding: $1,500,000
Award Ceiling: $500,000
Award Floor:

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants:
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
State governments
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Additional Information on Eligibility: See full announcement for complete details.

Additional Information

Agency Name: National Institutes of Health
Description: This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is an initiative of the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research (http://neuroscienceblueprint.nih.gov/), a collaborative and coordinated effort across 13 Institutes and Centers that support research, research education, and research training with the goal of accelerating the pace of discovery in neuroscience research. This FOA will support integrated research education and research training programs that provide interdisciplinary training in experimental neuroscience and the theoretical and technological approaches of computational neuroscience at the undergraduate and predoctoral level.
Link to Additional Information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-16-009.html
Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

eRA Service Desk Monday to Friday 7 am to 8 pm ET http://grants.nih.gov/support/ Phone 1-866-504-9552
Grants Info